Corporal Punishment, Maternal Warmth, and Child Adjustment: A Longitudinal Study in Eight Countries

Jennifer E. Lansford, Chinmayi Sharma, Patrick S. Malone, Darren Woodlief, Kenneth A. Dodge, Paul Oburu, Concetta Pastorelli, Ann T. Skinner, Emma Sorbring, Sombat Tapanya, Liliana Maria Uribe Tirado, Arnaldo Zelli, Suha M. Al-Hassan, Liane Peña Alampay, Dario Bacchini, Anna Silvia Bombi, Marc H. Bornstein, Lei Chang, Kirby Deater-Deckard, Laura Di Giunta

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Two key tasks facing parents across cultures are managing children's behaviors (and misbehaviors) and conveying love and affection. Previous research has found that corporal punishment generally is related to worse child adjustment, whereas parental warmth is related to better child adjustment. This study examined whether the association between corporal punishment and child adjustment problems (anxiety and aggression) is moderated by maternal warmth in a diverse set of countries that vary in a number of sociodemographic and psychological ways. Interviews were conducted with 7- to 10-year-old children (N = 1,196; 51% girls) and their mothers in 8 countries: China, Colombia, Italy, Jordan, Kenya, the Philippines, Thailand, and the United States. Follow-up interviews were conducted 1 and 2 years later. Corporal punishment was related to increases, and maternal warmth was related to decreases, in children's anxiety and aggression over time; however, these associations varied somewhat across groups. Maternal warmth moderated the effect of corporal punishment in some countries, with increases in anxiety over time for children whose mothers were high in both warmth and corporal punishment. The findings illustrate the overall association between corporal punishment and child anxiety and aggression as well as patterns specific to particular countries. Results suggest that clinicians across countries should advise parents against using corporal punishment, even in the context of parent-child relationships that are otherwise warm, and should assist parents in finding other ways to manage children's behaviors.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)670-685
Number of pages16
JournalJournal of Clinical Child and Adolescent Psychology
Volume43
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2014

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Social Adjustment
Punishment
Longitudinal Studies
Mothers
Anxiety
Aggression
Parents
Child Behavior
Interviews
Parent-Child Relations
Jordan
Philippines
Colombia
Love
Kenya
Thailand
Italy
China
Psychology
Research

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Developmental and Educational Psychology
  • Clinical Psychology

Cite this

Corporal Punishment, Maternal Warmth, and Child Adjustment : A Longitudinal Study in Eight Countries. / Lansford, Jennifer E.; Sharma, Chinmayi; Malone, Patrick S.; Woodlief, Darren; Dodge, Kenneth A.; Oburu, Paul; Pastorelli, Concetta; Skinner, Ann T.; Sorbring, Emma; Tapanya, Sombat; Tirado, Liliana Maria Uribe; Zelli, Arnaldo; Al-Hassan, Suha M.; Alampay, Liane Peña; Bacchini, Dario; Bombi, Anna Silvia; Bornstein, Marc H.; Chang, Lei; Deater-Deckard, Kirby; Di Giunta, Laura.

In: Journal of Clinical Child and Adolescent Psychology, Vol. 43, No. 4, 01.01.2014, p. 670-685.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Lansford, JE, Sharma, C, Malone, PS, Woodlief, D, Dodge, KA, Oburu, P, Pastorelli, C, Skinner, AT, Sorbring, E, Tapanya, S, Tirado, LMU, Zelli, A, Al-Hassan, SM, Alampay, LP, Bacchini, D, Bombi, AS, Bornstein, MH, Chang, L, Deater-Deckard, K & Di Giunta, L 2014, 'Corporal Punishment, Maternal Warmth, and Child Adjustment: A Longitudinal Study in Eight Countries', Journal of Clinical Child and Adolescent Psychology, vol. 43, no. 4, pp. 670-685. https://doi.org/10.1080/15374416.2014.893518
Lansford, Jennifer E. ; Sharma, Chinmayi ; Malone, Patrick S. ; Woodlief, Darren ; Dodge, Kenneth A. ; Oburu, Paul ; Pastorelli, Concetta ; Skinner, Ann T. ; Sorbring, Emma ; Tapanya, Sombat ; Tirado, Liliana Maria Uribe ; Zelli, Arnaldo ; Al-Hassan, Suha M. ; Alampay, Liane Peña ; Bacchini, Dario ; Bombi, Anna Silvia ; Bornstein, Marc H. ; Chang, Lei ; Deater-Deckard, Kirby ; Di Giunta, Laura. / Corporal Punishment, Maternal Warmth, and Child Adjustment : A Longitudinal Study in Eight Countries. In: Journal of Clinical Child and Adolescent Psychology. 2014 ; Vol. 43, No. 4. pp. 670-685.
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