Copy Number Variation in Domestication

Zoe N. Lye, Michael Purugganan

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

Abstract

Domesticated plants have long served as excellent models for studying evolution. Many genes and mutations underlying important domestication traits have been identified, and most causal mutations appear to be SNPs. Copy number variation (CNV) is an important source of genetic variation that has been largely neglected in studies of domestication. Ongoing work demonstrates the importance of CNVs as a source of genetic variation during domestication, and during the diversification of domesticated taxa. Here, we review how CNVs contribute to evolutionary processes underlying domestication, and review examples of domestication traits caused by CNVs. We draw from examples in plant species, but also highlight cases in animal systems that could illuminate the roles of CNVs in the domestication process.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalTrends in Plant Science
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2019

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domestication
mutation
genetic variation
animals
genes

Keywords

  • crop domestication
  • deletion
  • diversification
  • evolution
  • genome
  • livestock
  • pan-genome
  • polymorphism
  • presence/absence variation
  • structural variants

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Plant Science

Cite this

Copy Number Variation in Domestication. / Lye, Zoe N.; Purugganan, Michael.

In: Trends in Plant Science, 01.01.2019.

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

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