Convergence: News production in a digital age

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

A paradox of contemporary sociology is that the discipline has largely abandoned the empirical study of journalistic organizations and news institutions at the moment when the media has gained visibility in political, economic, and cultural spheres; when other academic fields have embraced the study of media and society; and when leading sociological theorists have broken from the disciplinary cannon to argue that the media are key actors in modern life. This article examines the point of journalistic production in one major news organization and shows how reporters and editors manage constraints of time, space, and market pressure under regimes of convergence news making. It considers the implications of these conditions for the particular forms of intellectual and cultural labor that journalists produce, drawing connections between the political economy of the journalistic field, the organizational structure of multimedia firms, new communications technologies, and the qualities of content created by media workers.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)48-64
Number of pages17
JournalAnnals of the American Academy of Political and Social Science
Volume597
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 2005

Fingerprint

news
reporter
organizational structure
journalist
multimedia
political economy
new technology
communication technology
sociology
editor
regime
labor
firm
worker
organization
market
economics

Keywords

  • Convergence
  • Journalism
  • Local news
  • News media
  • Newsroom
  • Sociology of media

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Sociology and Political Science
  • Social Sciences(all)

Cite this

Convergence : News production in a digital age. / Klinenberg, Eric.

In: Annals of the American Academy of Political and Social Science, Vol. 597, 01.2005, p. 48-64.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

@article{a84f8f75ffcc4d07b2e16864d81da743,
title = "Convergence: News production in a digital age",
abstract = "A paradox of contemporary sociology is that the discipline has largely abandoned the empirical study of journalistic organizations and news institutions at the moment when the media has gained visibility in political, economic, and cultural spheres; when other academic fields have embraced the study of media and society; and when leading sociological theorists have broken from the disciplinary cannon to argue that the media are key actors in modern life. This article examines the point of journalistic production in one major news organization and shows how reporters and editors manage constraints of time, space, and market pressure under regimes of convergence news making. It considers the implications of these conditions for the particular forms of intellectual and cultural labor that journalists produce, drawing connections between the political economy of the journalistic field, the organizational structure of multimedia firms, new communications technologies, and the qualities of content created by media workers.",
keywords = "Convergence, Journalism, Local news, News media, Newsroom, Sociology of media",
author = "Eric Klinenberg",
year = "2005",
month = "1",
doi = "10.1177/0002716204270346",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "597",
pages = "48--64",
journal = "Annals of the American Academy of Political and Social Science",
issn = "0002-7162",
publisher = "SAGE Publications Inc.",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Convergence

T2 - News production in a digital age

AU - Klinenberg, Eric

PY - 2005/1

Y1 - 2005/1

N2 - A paradox of contemporary sociology is that the discipline has largely abandoned the empirical study of journalistic organizations and news institutions at the moment when the media has gained visibility in political, economic, and cultural spheres; when other academic fields have embraced the study of media and society; and when leading sociological theorists have broken from the disciplinary cannon to argue that the media are key actors in modern life. This article examines the point of journalistic production in one major news organization and shows how reporters and editors manage constraints of time, space, and market pressure under regimes of convergence news making. It considers the implications of these conditions for the particular forms of intellectual and cultural labor that journalists produce, drawing connections between the political economy of the journalistic field, the organizational structure of multimedia firms, new communications technologies, and the qualities of content created by media workers.

AB - A paradox of contemporary sociology is that the discipline has largely abandoned the empirical study of journalistic organizations and news institutions at the moment when the media has gained visibility in political, economic, and cultural spheres; when other academic fields have embraced the study of media and society; and when leading sociological theorists have broken from the disciplinary cannon to argue that the media are key actors in modern life. This article examines the point of journalistic production in one major news organization and shows how reporters and editors manage constraints of time, space, and market pressure under regimes of convergence news making. It considers the implications of these conditions for the particular forms of intellectual and cultural labor that journalists produce, drawing connections between the political economy of the journalistic field, the organizational structure of multimedia firms, new communications technologies, and the qualities of content created by media workers.

KW - Convergence

KW - Journalism

KW - Local news

KW - News media

KW - Newsroom

KW - Sociology of media

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=11144300196&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=11144300196&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1177/0002716204270346

DO - 10.1177/0002716204270346

M3 - Article

AN - SCOPUS:11144300196

VL - 597

SP - 48

EP - 64

JO - Annals of the American Academy of Political and Social Science

JF - Annals of the American Academy of Political and Social Science

SN - 0002-7162

ER -