Contextualizing Gay-Straight Alliances

Student, Advisor, and Structural Factors Related to Positive Youth Development Among Members

V. Paul Poteat, Hirokazu Yoshikawa, Jerel P. Calzo, Mary L. Gray, Craig D. Digiovanni, Arthur Lipkin, Adrienne Mundy-Shephard, Jeff Perrotti, Jillian R. Scheer, Matthew P. Shaw

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Gay-straight alliances (GSAs) may promote resilience. Yet, what GSA components predict well-being? Among 146 youth and advisors in 13 GSAs (58% lesbian, gay, bisexual, or questioning; 64% White; 38% received free/reduced-cost lunch), student (demographics, victimization, attendance frequency, leadership, support, control), advisor (years served, training, control), and contextual factors (overall support or advocacy, outside support for the GSA) that predicted purpose, mastery, and self-esteem were tested. In multilevel models, GSA support predicted all outcomes. Racial/ethnic minority youth reported greater well-being, yet lower support. Youth in GSAs whose advisors served longer and perceived more control and were in more supportive school contexts reported healthier outcomes. GSA advocacy also predicted purpose. Ethnographic notes elucidated complex associations and variability as to how GSAs operated.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)176-193
Number of pages18
JournalChild Development
Volume86
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2015

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Students
well-being
student
victimization
national minority
resilience
self-esteem
leadership
costs
school
Sexual Minorities
Lunch
Crime Victims
Self Concept
Demography
Costs and Cost Analysis

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Developmental and Educational Psychology
  • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health
  • Education

Cite this

Contextualizing Gay-Straight Alliances : Student, Advisor, and Structural Factors Related to Positive Youth Development Among Members. / Poteat, V. Paul; Yoshikawa, Hirokazu; Calzo, Jerel P.; Gray, Mary L.; Digiovanni, Craig D.; Lipkin, Arthur; Mundy-Shephard, Adrienne; Perrotti, Jeff; Scheer, Jillian R.; Shaw, Matthew P.

In: Child Development, Vol. 86, No. 1, 01.01.2015, p. 176-193.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Poteat, VP, Yoshikawa, H, Calzo, JP, Gray, ML, Digiovanni, CD, Lipkin, A, Mundy-Shephard, A, Perrotti, J, Scheer, JR & Shaw, MP 2015, 'Contextualizing Gay-Straight Alliances: Student, Advisor, and Structural Factors Related to Positive Youth Development Among Members', Child Development, vol. 86, no. 1, pp. 176-193. https://doi.org/10.1111/cdev.12289
Poteat, V. Paul ; Yoshikawa, Hirokazu ; Calzo, Jerel P. ; Gray, Mary L. ; Digiovanni, Craig D. ; Lipkin, Arthur ; Mundy-Shephard, Adrienne ; Perrotti, Jeff ; Scheer, Jillian R. ; Shaw, Matthew P. / Contextualizing Gay-Straight Alliances : Student, Advisor, and Structural Factors Related to Positive Youth Development Among Members. In: Child Development. 2015 ; Vol. 86, No. 1. pp. 176-193.
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