Conservatives negatively evaluate counterstereotypical people to maintain a sense of certainty

Chadly Stern, Tessa West, Nicholas O. Rule, Susan T. Fiske

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

People frequently use physical appearance stereotypes to categorize individuals when their group membership is not directly observable. Recent research indicates that political conservatives tend to use such stereotypes more than liberals do because they express a greater desire for certainty and order. In the present research, we found that conservatives were also more likely to negatively evaluate and distribute fewer economic resources to people who deviate from the stereotypes of their group. This occurred for people belonging to both preexisting and novel groups, regardless of whether the stereotypes were real or experimentally fabricated. Critically, conservatives only negatively evaluated counterstereotypical people when the stereotypes were functional - that is, when they expected that they would need to use the stereotypes at a later point to categorize individuals into groups. Moreover, increasing liberals' desire for certainty led them to negatively evaluate counterstereotypical people just like conservatives did. Thus, conservatives are not only more likely to use stereotypes than are liberals, but are especially likely to negatively evaluate counterstereotypical people to organize the social world with greater certainty.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)15337-15342
Number of pages6
JournalProceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America
Volume112
Issue number50
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 15 2015

Fingerprint

Research
Economics

Keywords

  • Ideology
  • Social evaluation
  • Stereotyping

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • General

Cite this

Conservatives negatively evaluate counterstereotypical people to maintain a sense of certainty. / Stern, Chadly; West, Tessa; Rule, Nicholas O.; Fiske, Susan T.

In: Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, Vol. 112, No. 50, 15.12.2015, p. 15337-15342.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

@article{9bbaf50f047a4602b88115291d8df9aa,
title = "Conservatives negatively evaluate counterstereotypical people to maintain a sense of certainty",
abstract = "People frequently use physical appearance stereotypes to categorize individuals when their group membership is not directly observable. Recent research indicates that political conservatives tend to use such stereotypes more than liberals do because they express a greater desire for certainty and order. In the present research, we found that conservatives were also more likely to negatively evaluate and distribute fewer economic resources to people who deviate from the stereotypes of their group. This occurred for people belonging to both preexisting and novel groups, regardless of whether the stereotypes were real or experimentally fabricated. Critically, conservatives only negatively evaluated counterstereotypical people when the stereotypes were functional - that is, when they expected that they would need to use the stereotypes at a later point to categorize individuals into groups. Moreover, increasing liberals' desire for certainty led them to negatively evaluate counterstereotypical people just like conservatives did. Thus, conservatives are not only more likely to use stereotypes than are liberals, but are especially likely to negatively evaluate counterstereotypical people to organize the social world with greater certainty.",
keywords = "Ideology, Social evaluation, Stereotyping",
author = "Chadly Stern and Tessa West and Rule, {Nicholas O.} and Fiske, {Susan T.}",
year = "2015",
month = "12",
day = "15",
doi = "10.1073/pnas.1517662112",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "112",
pages = "15337--15342",
journal = "Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America",
issn = "0027-8424",
number = "50",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Conservatives negatively evaluate counterstereotypical people to maintain a sense of certainty

AU - Stern, Chadly

AU - West, Tessa

AU - Rule, Nicholas O.

AU - Fiske, Susan T.

PY - 2015/12/15

Y1 - 2015/12/15

N2 - People frequently use physical appearance stereotypes to categorize individuals when their group membership is not directly observable. Recent research indicates that political conservatives tend to use such stereotypes more than liberals do because they express a greater desire for certainty and order. In the present research, we found that conservatives were also more likely to negatively evaluate and distribute fewer economic resources to people who deviate from the stereotypes of their group. This occurred for people belonging to both preexisting and novel groups, regardless of whether the stereotypes were real or experimentally fabricated. Critically, conservatives only negatively evaluated counterstereotypical people when the stereotypes were functional - that is, when they expected that they would need to use the stereotypes at a later point to categorize individuals into groups. Moreover, increasing liberals' desire for certainty led them to negatively evaluate counterstereotypical people just like conservatives did. Thus, conservatives are not only more likely to use stereotypes than are liberals, but are especially likely to negatively evaluate counterstereotypical people to organize the social world with greater certainty.

AB - People frequently use physical appearance stereotypes to categorize individuals when their group membership is not directly observable. Recent research indicates that political conservatives tend to use such stereotypes more than liberals do because they express a greater desire for certainty and order. In the present research, we found that conservatives were also more likely to negatively evaluate and distribute fewer economic resources to people who deviate from the stereotypes of their group. This occurred for people belonging to both preexisting and novel groups, regardless of whether the stereotypes were real or experimentally fabricated. Critically, conservatives only negatively evaluated counterstereotypical people when the stereotypes were functional - that is, when they expected that they would need to use the stereotypes at a later point to categorize individuals into groups. Moreover, increasing liberals' desire for certainty led them to negatively evaluate counterstereotypical people just like conservatives did. Thus, conservatives are not only more likely to use stereotypes than are liberals, but are especially likely to negatively evaluate counterstereotypical people to organize the social world with greater certainty.

KW - Ideology

KW - Social evaluation

KW - Stereotyping

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=84950112169&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=84950112169&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1073/pnas.1517662112

DO - 10.1073/pnas.1517662112

M3 - Article

VL - 112

SP - 15337

EP - 15342

JO - Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America

JF - Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America

SN - 0027-8424

IS - 50

ER -