Consent Challenges for Participation of Young Men Who Have Sex With Men in HIV Prevention Research in Thailand

Thomas E. Guadamuz, Lloyd Goldsamt, Pimpawun Boonmongkon

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Young men who have sex with men (YMSM) younger than 18 years are often excluded from HIV prevention research in Thailand due to cultural attitudes toward youth sexuality, social stigma, and difficulties obtaining guardian permission. Culturally sensitive focus group discussions conducted with parents and YMSM in Bangkok, Thailand, identified barriers and facilitators related to minors’ participation in HIV prevention research. Although gender and class differences emerged, mothers and fathers were generally accepting of research to reduce HIV risk but not in favor of waiver. Youth’s positive attitude toward parental permission was tempered by concerns about harms posed by disclosing same-sex attraction through permission forms.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)180-195
Number of pages16
JournalEthics and Behavior
Volume25
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 4 2015

Fingerprint

Thailand
HIV
Research
Social Stigma
Minors
Sexuality
Focus Groups
Fathers
Parents
Mothers

Keywords

  • bisexual
  • gay
  • guardian consent
  • HIV
  • IRB
  • minors
  • research
  • Thailand
  • youth

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Psychology(all)
  • Social Psychology

Cite this

Consent Challenges for Participation of Young Men Who Have Sex With Men in HIV Prevention Research in Thailand. / Guadamuz, Thomas E.; Goldsamt, Lloyd; Boonmongkon, Pimpawun.

In: Ethics and Behavior, Vol. 25, No. 2, 04.03.2015, p. 180-195.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

@article{355dfdcf2287429c849dfaeda1175ace,
title = "Consent Challenges for Participation of Young Men Who Have Sex With Men in HIV Prevention Research in Thailand",
abstract = "Young men who have sex with men (YMSM) younger than 18 years are often excluded from HIV prevention research in Thailand due to cultural attitudes toward youth sexuality, social stigma, and difficulties obtaining guardian permission. Culturally sensitive focus group discussions conducted with parents and YMSM in Bangkok, Thailand, identified barriers and facilitators related to minors’ participation in HIV prevention research. Although gender and class differences emerged, mothers and fathers were generally accepting of research to reduce HIV risk but not in favor of waiver. Youth’s positive attitude toward parental permission was tempered by concerns about harms posed by disclosing same-sex attraction through permission forms.",
keywords = "bisexual, gay, guardian consent, HIV, IRB, minors, research, Thailand, youth",
author = "Guadamuz, {Thomas E.} and Lloyd Goldsamt and Pimpawun Boonmongkon",
year = "2015",
month = "3",
day = "4",
doi = "10.1080/10508422.2014.949721",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "25",
pages = "180--195",
journal = "Ethics and Behavior",
issn = "1050-8422",
publisher = "Routledge",
number = "2",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Consent Challenges for Participation of Young Men Who Have Sex With Men in HIV Prevention Research in Thailand

AU - Guadamuz, Thomas E.

AU - Goldsamt, Lloyd

AU - Boonmongkon, Pimpawun

PY - 2015/3/4

Y1 - 2015/3/4

N2 - Young men who have sex with men (YMSM) younger than 18 years are often excluded from HIV prevention research in Thailand due to cultural attitudes toward youth sexuality, social stigma, and difficulties obtaining guardian permission. Culturally sensitive focus group discussions conducted with parents and YMSM in Bangkok, Thailand, identified barriers and facilitators related to minors’ participation in HIV prevention research. Although gender and class differences emerged, mothers and fathers were generally accepting of research to reduce HIV risk but not in favor of waiver. Youth’s positive attitude toward parental permission was tempered by concerns about harms posed by disclosing same-sex attraction through permission forms.

AB - Young men who have sex with men (YMSM) younger than 18 years are often excluded from HIV prevention research in Thailand due to cultural attitudes toward youth sexuality, social stigma, and difficulties obtaining guardian permission. Culturally sensitive focus group discussions conducted with parents and YMSM in Bangkok, Thailand, identified barriers and facilitators related to minors’ participation in HIV prevention research. Although gender and class differences emerged, mothers and fathers were generally accepting of research to reduce HIV risk but not in favor of waiver. Youth’s positive attitude toward parental permission was tempered by concerns about harms posed by disclosing same-sex attraction through permission forms.

KW - bisexual

KW - gay

KW - guardian consent

KW - HIV

KW - IRB

KW - minors

KW - research

KW - Thailand

KW - youth

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=84924527797&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=84924527797&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1080/10508422.2014.949721

DO - 10.1080/10508422.2014.949721

M3 - Article

VL - 25

SP - 180

EP - 195

JO - Ethics and Behavior

JF - Ethics and Behavior

SN - 1050-8422

IS - 2

ER -