Connectivity properties of a mobile packet radio network model

T. K. Philips, Shivendra Panwar, A. N. Tantawi

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Abstract

A model of a packet radio network in which transmitters with a transmission range of R units are distributed according to a two-dimensional Poisson point process is examined. It is a widely held belief that an optimal number of nearest neighbors of a transmitter (the magic number) exists that maximizes the throughput of the network. The authors show that no magic number can exist. However, the notion of a magic number is shown to be useful, and an explanation is provided for why computations based on magic numbers give answers that are good in practice.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationProceedings - IEEE Military Communications Conference
PublisherPubl by IEEE
Pages777-781
Number of pages5
Volume3
StatePublished - 1988

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Transmitters
Throughput
Networks (circuits)

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Engineering(all)

Cite this

Philips, T. K., Panwar, S., & Tantawi, A. N. (1988). Connectivity properties of a mobile packet radio network model. In Proceedings - IEEE Military Communications Conference (Vol. 3, pp. 777-781). Publ by IEEE.

Connectivity properties of a mobile packet radio network model. / Philips, T. K.; Panwar, Shivendra; Tantawi, A. N.

Proceedings - IEEE Military Communications Conference. Vol. 3 Publ by IEEE, 1988. p. 777-781.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Philips, TK, Panwar, S & Tantawi, AN 1988, Connectivity properties of a mobile packet radio network model. in Proceedings - IEEE Military Communications Conference. vol. 3, Publ by IEEE, pp. 777-781.
Philips TK, Panwar S, Tantawi AN. Connectivity properties of a mobile packet radio network model. In Proceedings - IEEE Military Communications Conference. Vol. 3. Publ by IEEE. 1988. p. 777-781
Philips, T. K. ; Panwar, Shivendra ; Tantawi, A. N. / Connectivity properties of a mobile packet radio network model. Proceedings - IEEE Military Communications Conference. Vol. 3 Publ by IEEE, 1988. pp. 777-781
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