Concern for the in-group and opposition to affirmative action

Brian S. Lowery, Miguel M. Unzueta, Eric D. Knowles, Phillip Atiba Goff

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

The present experiments suggest that the desire to benefit the in-group drives dominant-group members' policy preferences, independent of concern for out-groups' outcomes. In Experiment 1, the effect of a manipulation of affirmative action procedures on policy support was mediated by how Whites expected the policy to affect fellow Whites, but not by the expected effect on minorities. In Experiments 2 and 3, when focused on losses for the White in-group, Whites' racial identity was negatively related to support for affirmative action. However, when focused on gains for the Black out-group or when participants were told that Whites were not affected by the policy, racial identity did not predict attitudes toward the policy. In Experiments 2 and 3, perceived fairness mediated these effects.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)961-974
Number of pages14
JournalJournal of Personality and Social Psychology
Volume90
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 2006

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affirmative action
opposition
experiment
outgroup
Group
racial policy
group membership
fairness
manipulation
minority

Keywords

  • Affirmative action
  • Group interest
  • Race
  • White identity

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Sociology and Political Science

Cite this

Concern for the in-group and opposition to affirmative action. / Lowery, Brian S.; Unzueta, Miguel M.; Knowles, Eric D.; Goff, Phillip Atiba.

In: Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, Vol. 90, No. 6, 06.2006, p. 961-974.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Lowery, Brian S. ; Unzueta, Miguel M. ; Knowles, Eric D. ; Goff, Phillip Atiba. / Concern for the in-group and opposition to affirmative action. In: Journal of Personality and Social Psychology. 2006 ; Vol. 90, No. 6. pp. 961-974.
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