Computing simple circuits from a set of line segments

David Rappaport, Hiroshi Imai, Godfried Toussaint

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    Abstract

    We address the problem of connecting line segments to form the boundary of a simple polygon-a simple circuit. However, not every set of segments can be so connected. We present an O(n log n)-time algorithm to determine whether a set of segments, constrained so that each segment has at least one endpoint on the boundary of the convex hull of the segments, admits a simple circuit. Furthermore, this technique can also be used to compute a simple circuit of minimum perimeter, or a simple circuit that bounds the minimum area, with no increase in computational complexity.

    Original languageEnglish (US)
    Pages (from-to)289-304
    Number of pages16
    JournalDiscrete & Computational Geometry
    Volume5
    Issue number1
    DOIs
    StatePublished - Dec 1 1990

    Fingerprint

    Line segment
    Networks (circuits)
    Computing
    Simple Polygon
    Perimeter
    Convex Hull
    Computational complexity
    Computational Complexity

    ASJC Scopus subject areas

    • Theoretical Computer Science
    • Geometry and Topology
    • Discrete Mathematics and Combinatorics
    • Computational Theory and Mathematics

    Cite this

    Computing simple circuits from a set of line segments. / Rappaport, David; Imai, Hiroshi; Toussaint, Godfried.

    In: Discrete & Computational Geometry, Vol. 5, No. 1, 01.12.1990, p. 289-304.

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    Rappaport, David ; Imai, Hiroshi ; Toussaint, Godfried. / Computing simple circuits from a set of line segments. In: Discrete & Computational Geometry. 1990 ; Vol. 5, No. 1. pp. 289-304.
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