Communicating about chromosomes

patients, providers, and cultural assumptions.

Rayna Rapp

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    Abstract

    Field-based anthropological research on the social impact and cultural meaning of prenatal diagnosis suggests four factors that contribute to multicultural patient-provider miscommunication. These are: 1) the detection of fetal mental retardation, particularly Down syndrome, is not always an appropriate reason to test; 2) the statistical information on age-related risk rates for chromosome abnormality may appear small when compared to more pressing vulnerabilities faced by poor and/or immigrant pregnant women and their families; 3) variation in individual reproductive histories and social values strongly shape acceptance and rejection of the test; and 4) most controversially, not everyone accepts the burdens of individual choice.

    Original languageEnglish (US)
    JournalJournal of the American Medical Women's Association (1972)
    Volume52
    Issue number1
    StatePublished - 1997

    Fingerprint

    Social Values
    Reproductive History
    Anthropology
    Down Syndrome
    Social Change
    Prenatal Diagnosis
    Chromosome Aberrations
    Intellectual Disability
    Pregnant Women
    Chromosomes
    Research
    Rejection (Psychology)

    Cite this

    Communicating about chromosomes : patients, providers, and cultural assumptions. / Rapp, Rayna.

    In: Journal of the American Medical Women's Association (1972), Vol. 52, No. 1, 1997.

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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