Common brain regions essential for the expression of learned and instinctive visual habits in the albino rat

R. Thompson, Joseph Ledoux

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Different groups of adult rats were subjected to discrete lesions in 1 of 10 different areas of the brain which were previously found to be implicated in the retention of learned brightness and pattern discrimination habits. When tested for the rodent's predictable (instinctive) preference for the dark, 8 groups showed deficient preference scores and 2 showed preference scores comparable to that of the control group. Those groups with lesions of brain structures not implicated in the retention of learned visual discrimination habits exhibited normal preference scores. These data suggest the existence of common as well as diverse neuroanatomical substrata which are necessary for the expression of both classes of adaptive behavior.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)78-80
Number of pages3
JournalBulletin of the Psychonomic Society
Volume4
Issue number2 A
StatePublished - 1974

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Habits
Rats
Brain
Psychological Adaptation
Luminance
Rodentia
Control Groups

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Common brain regions essential for the expression of learned and instinctive visual habits in the albino rat. / Thompson, R.; Ledoux, Joseph.

In: Bulletin of the Psychonomic Society, Vol. 4, No. 2 A, 1974, p. 78-80.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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