Cognitive function and oral health among ageing adults

Jing Kang, Bei Wu, David Bunce, Mark Ide, Sue Pavitt, Jianhua Wu

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Objectives: There is inconclusive evidence that cognitive function is associated with oral health in older adults. This study investigated the association between cognitive function and oral health among older adults in England. Methods: This longitudinal cohort study included 4416 dentate participants aged 50 years or older in the English Longitudinal Study of Ageing during 2002-2014. Cognitive function was assessed at baseline in 2002/2003 using a battery of cognitive function tests. The self-reported number of teeth remaining and self-rated general oral health status was reported in 2014/2015. Ordinal logistic regression was applied to model the association between cognitive function at baseline and tooth loss or self-rated oral health. Results: Cognitive function at baseline was negatively associated with the risk of tooth loss (per each 1 standard deviation lower in cognitive function score, OR: 1.13, 95% CI: 1.05-1.21). When cognitive function score was categorized into quintiles, there was a clear gradient association between cognitive function and tooth loss (P-trend = 0.003); people in the lowest quintile of cognitive function had higher risk of tooth loss than those in the highest quintile (OR: 1.39, 95% CI: 1.12-1.74). A similar magnitude and direction of association were evident between cognitive function and self-rated oral health. Conclusion: This longitudinal study in an English ageing population has demonstrated that poor cognitive function at early stage was associated with poorer oral health and higher risk of tooth loss in later life. The gradient relationship suggests that an improvement in cognitive function could potentially improve oral health and reduce the risk of tooth loss in the ageing population.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)259-266
Number of pages8
JournalCommunity Dentistry and Oral Epidemiology
Volume47
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 1 2019

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Oral Health
Cognition
Tooth Loss
Longitudinal Studies
England
Population
Health Status
Tooth
Cohort Studies
Logistic Models

Keywords

  • cognition
  • english longitudinal study of ageing
  • memory
  • oral health
  • tooth loss

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Dentistry(all)
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

Cite this

Cognitive function and oral health among ageing adults. / Kang, Jing; Wu, Bei; Bunce, David; Ide, Mark; Pavitt, Sue; Wu, Jianhua.

In: Community Dentistry and Oral Epidemiology, Vol. 47, No. 3, 01.06.2019, p. 259-266.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Kang, Jing ; Wu, Bei ; Bunce, David ; Ide, Mark ; Pavitt, Sue ; Wu, Jianhua. / Cognitive function and oral health among ageing adults. In: Community Dentistry and Oral Epidemiology. 2019 ; Vol. 47, No. 3. pp. 259-266.
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