Cognitive activities and levels of abstraction in procedural and object-oriented design

Nancy Pennington, Adrienne Y. Lee, Robert Rehder

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

An attempt was made to provide descriptions of design activities and of the evolving designs for expert procedural and expert object-oriented (OO) designers and for novice OO designers who also has extensive procedural experience. In view of this, ten experienced programmers were observed while designing software that would serve as a scoring system for swim meet competitions. In particular, both the design activities and the level of abstraction of the designs over the course of time for each group were analysed in order to examine the role of several design strategies previously described as central in procedural design. Analyses results provide a detailed comparison between design paradigms in practice. Finally, the results obtained are presented.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)171-226
Number of pages56
JournalHuman-Computer Interaction
Volume10
Issue number2-3
StatePublished - 1995

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Object-oriented Design
Software
Object-oriented
Abstraction
Design
Scoring
Paradigm

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Computational Theory and Mathematics
  • Human-Computer Interaction
  • Theoretical Computer Science

Cite this

Cognitive activities and levels of abstraction in procedural and object-oriented design. / Pennington, Nancy; Lee, Adrienne Y.; Rehder, Robert.

In: Human-Computer Interaction, Vol. 10, No. 2-3, 1995, p. 171-226.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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