Co-occurrence of intoxication during sex and sexually transmissible infections among young African American women: Does partner intoxication matter?

Richard A. Crosby, Ralph DiClemente, Gina M. Wingood, Laura F. Salazar, Delia Lang, Eve Rose, Jessica McDermott-Sales

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Background: The co-occurrence of a behaviour (being intoxicated on alcohol/drugs during sex) with a disease outcome [laboratory-confirmed sexually transmissible infection (STI) prevalence] among young African American women and their male sex partners was studied. Methods: A cross-sectional study was conducted. Recruitment and data collection occurred in three clinics located in a metropolitan city of the Southern USA. A total of 715 African American adolescent females (15-21 years old) were enrolled (82% participation rate). The primary outcome measure was the analysis of self-collected vaginal swabs using nucleic acid amplification assays for Trichomonas vaginalis, Chlamydia trachomatis, and Neisseria gonorrhoeae. Results: After controlling for age and self-efficacy to negotiate condom use, young women's alcohol/drug use while having sex was not significantly associated with STI prevalence [adjusted odds ratios (AOR):≤:1.29, 95% confidence interval (CI):≤:0.90-1.83]. However, using the same covariates, the association between male partners' alcohol/drug use and sexually transmitted disease prevalence was significant (AOR:≤:1.44, 95% CI:≤:1.03-2.02). Young women reporting that their sex partners had been drunk or high while having sex (at least once in the past 60 days) were ∼1.4 times more likely to test positive for at least one of the three assessed STIs. Conclusion: Young African American women reporting a male sex partner had been intoxicated during sex were significantly more likely to have an STI. The nature of this phenomenon could be a consequence of women's selection of risky partners and lack of condom use possibly stemming from their intoxication or their partners' intoxication.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)285-289
Number of pages5
JournalSexual Health
Volume5
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 20 2008

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African Americans
Infection
Alcohols
Condoms
Sexually Transmitted Diseases
Odds Ratio
Pharmaceutical Preparations
Confidence Intervals
Trichomonas vaginalis
Neisseria gonorrhoeae
Chlamydia trachomatis
Self Efficacy
Nucleic Acids
Cross-Sectional Studies
Outcome Assessment (Health Care)

Keywords

  • Adolescent females
  • Condom use
  • Sexual behaviour

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health
  • Infectious Diseases

Cite this

Co-occurrence of intoxication during sex and sexually transmissible infections among young African American women : Does partner intoxication matter? / Crosby, Richard A.; DiClemente, Ralph; Wingood, Gina M.; Salazar, Laura F.; Lang, Delia; Rose, Eve; McDermott-Sales, Jessica.

In: Sexual Health, Vol. 5, No. 3, 20.08.2008, p. 285-289.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Crosby, Richard A. ; DiClemente, Ralph ; Wingood, Gina M. ; Salazar, Laura F. ; Lang, Delia ; Rose, Eve ; McDermott-Sales, Jessica. / Co-occurrence of intoxication during sex and sexually transmissible infections among young African American women : Does partner intoxication matter?. In: Sexual Health. 2008 ; Vol. 5, No. 3. pp. 285-289.
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abstract = "Background: The co-occurrence of a behaviour (being intoxicated on alcohol/drugs during sex) with a disease outcome [laboratory-confirmed sexually transmissible infection (STI) prevalence] among young African American women and their male sex partners was studied. Methods: A cross-sectional study was conducted. Recruitment and data collection occurred in three clinics located in a metropolitan city of the Southern USA. A total of 715 African American adolescent females (15-21 years old) were enrolled (82{\%} participation rate). The primary outcome measure was the analysis of self-collected vaginal swabs using nucleic acid amplification assays for Trichomonas vaginalis, Chlamydia trachomatis, and Neisseria gonorrhoeae. Results: After controlling for age and self-efficacy to negotiate condom use, young women's alcohol/drug use while having sex was not significantly associated with STI prevalence [adjusted odds ratios (AOR):≤:1.29, 95{\%} confidence interval (CI):≤:0.90-1.83]. However, using the same covariates, the association between male partners' alcohol/drug use and sexually transmitted disease prevalence was significant (AOR:≤:1.44, 95{\%} CI:≤:1.03-2.02). Young women reporting that their sex partners had been drunk or high while having sex (at least once in the past 60 days) were ∼1.4 times more likely to test positive for at least one of the three assessed STIs. Conclusion: Young African American women reporting a male sex partner had been intoxicated during sex were significantly more likely to have an STI. The nature of this phenomenon could be a consequence of women's selection of risky partners and lack of condom use possibly stemming from their intoxication or their partners' intoxication.",
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