Cluster (school) RCT of parentcorps

Impact on kindergarten academic achievement

Laurie Miller Brotman, Spring Dawson-McClure, Esther J. Calzada, Keng Yen Huang, Dimitra Kamboukos, Joseph J. Palamar, Eva Petkova

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the impact of an early childhood, family-centered, school-based intervention on children's kindergarten academic achievement. METHODS: This was a cluster (school) randomized controlled trial with assessments from pre-kindergarten (pre-k) entry through the end of kindergarten. The setting was 10 public elementary schools with 26 pre-k classes in 2 school districts in urban disadvantaged neighborhoods serving a largely black, low-income population. Participants were 1050 black and Latino, low-income children (age 4; 88% of pre-k population) enrolled in 10 schools over 4 years. Universal intervention aimed to promote self-regulation and early learning by strengthening positive behavior support and effective behavior management at home and school, and increasing parent involvement in education. Intervention included after-school group sessions for families of pre-k students (13 2-hour sessions; co-led by pre-k teachers) and professional development for pre-k and kindergarten teachers. The outcome measures were standardized test scores of kindergarten reading, writing, and math achievement by independent evaluators masked to intervention condition (primary outcome); developmental trajectories of teacher-rated academic performance from pre-k through kindergarten (secondary outcome). RESULTS: Relative to children in control schools, children in intervention schools had higher kindergarten achievement test scores (Cohen's d = 0.18, mean difference = 2.64, SE = 0.90, P = .03) and higher teacher-rated academic performance (Cohen's d = 0.25, mean difference = 5.65, SE = 2.34, P = .01). CONCLUSIONS: Early childhood population-level intervention that enhances both home and school environments shows promise to advance academic achievement among minority children from disadvantaged, urban neighborhoods.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalPediatrics
Volume131
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - May 2013

Fingerprint

Vulnerable Populations
Kindergarten
Randomized Controlled Trial
Academic Achievement
Poverty
Hispanic Americans
Population
Reading
Randomized Controlled Trials
Outcome Assessment (Health Care)
Learning
Students
Education
Test Scores
Early childhood
Income
Academic Performance
PreR-Co
Self-Control
Latinos

Keywords

  • Academic achievement
  • Early childhood
  • Family intervention
  • Poverty

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health
  • Arts and Humanities (miscellaneous)

Cite this

Brotman, L. M., Dawson-McClure, S., Calzada, E. J., Huang, K. Y., Kamboukos, D., Palamar, J. J., & Petkova, E. (2013). Cluster (school) RCT of parentcorps: Impact on kindergarten academic achievement. Pediatrics, 131(5). https://doi.org/10.1542/peds.2012-2632

Cluster (school) RCT of parentcorps : Impact on kindergarten academic achievement. / Brotman, Laurie Miller; Dawson-McClure, Spring; Calzada, Esther J.; Huang, Keng Yen; Kamboukos, Dimitra; Palamar, Joseph J.; Petkova, Eva.

In: Pediatrics, Vol. 131, No. 5, 05.2013.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Brotman, LM, Dawson-McClure, S, Calzada, EJ, Huang, KY, Kamboukos, D, Palamar, JJ & Petkova, E 2013, 'Cluster (school) RCT of parentcorps: Impact on kindergarten academic achievement', Pediatrics, vol. 131, no. 5. https://doi.org/10.1542/peds.2012-2632
Brotman LM, Dawson-McClure S, Calzada EJ, Huang KY, Kamboukos D, Palamar JJ et al. Cluster (school) RCT of parentcorps: Impact on kindergarten academic achievement. Pediatrics. 2013 May;131(5). https://doi.org/10.1542/peds.2012-2632
Brotman, Laurie Miller ; Dawson-McClure, Spring ; Calzada, Esther J. ; Huang, Keng Yen ; Kamboukos, Dimitra ; Palamar, Joseph J. ; Petkova, Eva. / Cluster (school) RCT of parentcorps : Impact on kindergarten academic achievement. In: Pediatrics. 2013 ; Vol. 131, No. 5.
@article{06275b4052d14cb4ac3f6163c7a6e7aa,
title = "Cluster (school) RCT of parentcorps: Impact on kindergarten academic achievement",
abstract = "OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the impact of an early childhood, family-centered, school-based intervention on children's kindergarten academic achievement. METHODS: This was a cluster (school) randomized controlled trial with assessments from pre-kindergarten (pre-k) entry through the end of kindergarten. The setting was 10 public elementary schools with 26 pre-k classes in 2 school districts in urban disadvantaged neighborhoods serving a largely black, low-income population. Participants were 1050 black and Latino, low-income children (age 4; 88{\%} of pre-k population) enrolled in 10 schools over 4 years. Universal intervention aimed to promote self-regulation and early learning by strengthening positive behavior support and effective behavior management at home and school, and increasing parent involvement in education. Intervention included after-school group sessions for families of pre-k students (13 2-hour sessions; co-led by pre-k teachers) and professional development for pre-k and kindergarten teachers. The outcome measures were standardized test scores of kindergarten reading, writing, and math achievement by independent evaluators masked to intervention condition (primary outcome); developmental trajectories of teacher-rated academic performance from pre-k through kindergarten (secondary outcome). RESULTS: Relative to children in control schools, children in intervention schools had higher kindergarten achievement test scores (Cohen's d = 0.18, mean difference = 2.64, SE = 0.90, P = .03) and higher teacher-rated academic performance (Cohen's d = 0.25, mean difference = 5.65, SE = 2.34, P = .01). CONCLUSIONS: Early childhood population-level intervention that enhances both home and school environments shows promise to advance academic achievement among minority children from disadvantaged, urban neighborhoods.",
keywords = "Academic achievement, Early childhood, Family intervention, Poverty",
author = "Brotman, {Laurie Miller} and Spring Dawson-McClure and Calzada, {Esther J.} and Huang, {Keng Yen} and Dimitra Kamboukos and Palamar, {Joseph J.} and Eva Petkova",
year = "2013",
month = "5",
doi = "10.1542/peds.2012-2632",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "131",
journal = "Pediatrics",
issn = "0031-4005",
publisher = "American Academy of Pediatrics",
number = "5",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Cluster (school) RCT of parentcorps

T2 - Impact on kindergarten academic achievement

AU - Brotman, Laurie Miller

AU - Dawson-McClure, Spring

AU - Calzada, Esther J.

AU - Huang, Keng Yen

AU - Kamboukos, Dimitra

AU - Palamar, Joseph J.

AU - Petkova, Eva

PY - 2013/5

Y1 - 2013/5

N2 - OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the impact of an early childhood, family-centered, school-based intervention on children's kindergarten academic achievement. METHODS: This was a cluster (school) randomized controlled trial with assessments from pre-kindergarten (pre-k) entry through the end of kindergarten. The setting was 10 public elementary schools with 26 pre-k classes in 2 school districts in urban disadvantaged neighborhoods serving a largely black, low-income population. Participants were 1050 black and Latino, low-income children (age 4; 88% of pre-k population) enrolled in 10 schools over 4 years. Universal intervention aimed to promote self-regulation and early learning by strengthening positive behavior support and effective behavior management at home and school, and increasing parent involvement in education. Intervention included after-school group sessions for families of pre-k students (13 2-hour sessions; co-led by pre-k teachers) and professional development for pre-k and kindergarten teachers. The outcome measures were standardized test scores of kindergarten reading, writing, and math achievement by independent evaluators masked to intervention condition (primary outcome); developmental trajectories of teacher-rated academic performance from pre-k through kindergarten (secondary outcome). RESULTS: Relative to children in control schools, children in intervention schools had higher kindergarten achievement test scores (Cohen's d = 0.18, mean difference = 2.64, SE = 0.90, P = .03) and higher teacher-rated academic performance (Cohen's d = 0.25, mean difference = 5.65, SE = 2.34, P = .01). CONCLUSIONS: Early childhood population-level intervention that enhances both home and school environments shows promise to advance academic achievement among minority children from disadvantaged, urban neighborhoods.

AB - OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the impact of an early childhood, family-centered, school-based intervention on children's kindergarten academic achievement. METHODS: This was a cluster (school) randomized controlled trial with assessments from pre-kindergarten (pre-k) entry through the end of kindergarten. The setting was 10 public elementary schools with 26 pre-k classes in 2 school districts in urban disadvantaged neighborhoods serving a largely black, low-income population. Participants were 1050 black and Latino, low-income children (age 4; 88% of pre-k population) enrolled in 10 schools over 4 years. Universal intervention aimed to promote self-regulation and early learning by strengthening positive behavior support and effective behavior management at home and school, and increasing parent involvement in education. Intervention included after-school group sessions for families of pre-k students (13 2-hour sessions; co-led by pre-k teachers) and professional development for pre-k and kindergarten teachers. The outcome measures were standardized test scores of kindergarten reading, writing, and math achievement by independent evaluators masked to intervention condition (primary outcome); developmental trajectories of teacher-rated academic performance from pre-k through kindergarten (secondary outcome). RESULTS: Relative to children in control schools, children in intervention schools had higher kindergarten achievement test scores (Cohen's d = 0.18, mean difference = 2.64, SE = 0.90, P = .03) and higher teacher-rated academic performance (Cohen's d = 0.25, mean difference = 5.65, SE = 2.34, P = .01). CONCLUSIONS: Early childhood population-level intervention that enhances both home and school environments shows promise to advance academic achievement among minority children from disadvantaged, urban neighborhoods.

KW - Academic achievement

KW - Early childhood

KW - Family intervention

KW - Poverty

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=84877051561&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=84877051561&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1542/peds.2012-2632

DO - 10.1542/peds.2012-2632

M3 - Article

VL - 131

JO - Pediatrics

JF - Pediatrics

SN - 0031-4005

IS - 5

ER -