Clinicians’ panel management self-efficacy to support their patients’ smoking cessation and hypertension control needs

Shiela M. Strauss, Ashley E. Jensen, Katelyn Bennett, Nicole Skursky, Scott Sherman, Mark D. Schwartz

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Panel management, a set of tools and processes for proactively caring for patient populations, has potential to reduce morbidity and improve outcomes between office visits. We examined primary care staff’s self-efficacy in implementing panel management, its correlates, and an intervention’s impact on this self-efficacy. Primary care teams at two Veterans Health Administration (VA) hospitals were assigned to control or intervention conditions. Staff were surveyed at baseline and post-intervention, with a random subset interviewed post-intervention. Panel management self-efficacy was higher among staff participating in the panel management intervention. Self-efficacy was significantly correlated with sufficient training, aspects of team member interaction, and frequency of panel management use. Panel management self-efficacy was modest among primary care staff at two VA hospitals. Team level interventions may improve primary care staff’s confidence in practicing panel management, with this greater confidence related to greater team involvement with, and use of panel management.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)68-76
Number of pages9
JournalTranslational Behavioral Medicine
Volume5
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - 2015

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Smoking Cessation
Self Efficacy
Hypertension
Primary Health Care
Veterans Health
United States Department of Veterans Affairs
Office Visits
Morbidity
Population

Keywords

  • Chronic disease management
  • Panel management
  • Prevention
  • Primary care
  • Self-efficacy

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Behavioral Neuroscience
  • Applied Psychology

Cite this

Clinicians’ panel management self-efficacy to support their patients’ smoking cessation and hypertension control needs. / Strauss, Shiela M.; Jensen, Ashley E.; Bennett, Katelyn; Skursky, Nicole; Sherman, Scott; Schwartz, Mark D.

In: Translational Behavioral Medicine, Vol. 5, No. 1, 2015, p. 68-76.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Strauss, Shiela M. ; Jensen, Ashley E. ; Bennett, Katelyn ; Skursky, Nicole ; Sherman, Scott ; Schwartz, Mark D. / Clinicians’ panel management self-efficacy to support their patients’ smoking cessation and hypertension control needs. In: Translational Behavioral Medicine. 2015 ; Vol. 5, No. 1. pp. 68-76.
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