Clinical and radiographic outcomes of traumatized immature permanent necrotic teeth after revascularization/revitalization therapy

Tarek Mohamed A Saoud, Ashraf Zaazou, Ahmed Nabil, Sybel Moussa, Louis Lin, Jennifer Gibbs

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Introduction: Revascularization treatment is rapidly becoming an accepted treatment alternative for the management of endodontic pathology in immature permanent teeth with necrotic dental pulps. However, the success and timing of clinical resolution of symptoms, and radiographic outcomes of interest, such as continued hard tissue deposition within the root, are largely unknown. Methods: In this prospective cohort study, 20 teeth were treated with a standardized revascularization treatment protocol and monitored for clinical and radiographic changes for 1 year. Standardized radiographs were collected at regular intervals, and radiographic changes were quantified. Results: All 20 treated teeth survived during the 12- month follow-up period, and all 20 also met the clinical criteria for success at 12 months. As a group, the treated teeth showed a statistically significant increase in radiographic root width and length and a decrease in apical diameter, although the changes in many cases were quite small (such that the clinical significance is unclear). The within-case percent change in apical diameter after 3 months was 16% and had increased to 79% by 12 months, with 55% (11/20) showing complete apical closure. The within-case percent change in root length averaged less than 1% at 3 months and increased to 5% at 12 months. The within-case percent change in root thickness averaged 3% at 3 months and 21% at 12 months. Conclusions: Although clinical success was highly predictable with this procedure, clinically meaningful radiographic root thickening and lengthening are less predictable after 1-year of follow-up. Apical closure is the most consistent radiographic finding.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1946-1952
Number of pages7
JournalJournal of Endodontics
Volume40
Issue number12
DOIs
StatePublished - 2014

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Tooth
Dental Pulp
Endodontics
Therapeutics
Clinical Protocols
Cohort Studies
Prospective Studies
Pathology

Keywords

  • Clinical outcomes
  • Clinical research
  • Endodontic outcomes
  • Prospective cohort study
  • Radiographic outcomes
  • Regenerative endodontics
  • Revascularization
  • Revitalization

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Dentistry(all)

Cite this

Clinical and radiographic outcomes of traumatized immature permanent necrotic teeth after revascularization/revitalization therapy. / Saoud, Tarek Mohamed A; Zaazou, Ashraf; Nabil, Ahmed; Moussa, Sybel; Lin, Louis; Gibbs, Jennifer.

In: Journal of Endodontics, Vol. 40, No. 12, 2014, p. 1946-1952.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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AU - Lin, Louis

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