Child Maltreatment Screening and Anticipatory Guidance: A Description of Pediatric Nurse Practitioner Practice Behaviors

Gail Hornor, Deborah Bretl, Evelyn Chapman, Pamela Herendeen, Nancy Mitchel, Barbara Mulvaney, Saribel Quinones, Brigit VanGraafeiland

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Introduction Given the number of children affected by child maltreatment and the dire consequences that can develop, prompt identification of child maltreatment is crucial. The purpose of this study was to describe pediatric nurse practitioner (PNP) practice behaviors related to screening and providing anticipatory guidance for child maltreatment and its psychosocial risk factors. Method The Risk Assessment Survey was developed for this study by 12 PNPs, all of whom were members of NAPNAP's Child Maltreatment Special Interest Group to ensure face validity; all 12 PNPs were content experts in child maltreatment. The content of the survey was derived from key characteristics from the evidence on child maltreatment. The survey was emailed to the more than 8500 NAPNAP members. Results Two hundred forty-three PNPs responded to the survey, which represents a response rate of 3%. Approximately half of the participants (n = 121; 51%) stated that they never/rarely ask parents questions about domestic violence, more than one-fourth (n = 71; 30%) reported that they never/rarely ask parents questions about discipline, and half of the responding PNPs (n = 120; 50%) reported that they perform an ano-genital exam at well visits. Discussion This study demonstrates that a significant number of PNPs do not routinely screen for child maltreatment and psychosocial risk factors. This is especially true in regards to sexual abuse screening and anticipatory guidance.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)e35-e44
JournalJournal of Pediatric Health Care
Volume31
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - 2017

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Keywords

  • Child maltreatment
  • pediatric nurse practitioner
  • screening, anticipatory guidance

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health

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