Child care in the wake of welfare reform: The impact of government subsidies on the economic well-being of single-mother families

Marcia K. Meyers, Wen-Jui Han, Jane Waldfogel, Irwin Garfinkel

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    Abstract

    Using microsimulation techniques to estimate the impact of welfare reform in New York, we find that 5 years after federal and state reforms child-care use and costs will rise substantially and families will bear most of these costs. When family incomes are adjusted for child-care costs, most single-mother families will continue to be poor even with greater earnings, the Earned Income Tax Credit, and food stamps. The distribution of child-care costs between government and families, and the implications for poverty, will depend on the extent to which government subsidizes the child-care costs of single mothers.

    Original languageEnglish (US)
    Pages (from-to)29-58
    Number of pages30
    JournalSocial Service Review
    Volume75
    Issue number1
    StatePublished - Mar 1 2001

    Fingerprint

    government subsidies
    child care
    well-being
    welfare
    reform
    costs
    economics
    earned income
    income tax
    family income
    credit
    poverty
    food

    ASJC Scopus subject areas

    • Sociology and Political Science

    Cite this

    Child care in the wake of welfare reform : The impact of government subsidies on the economic well-being of single-mother families. / Meyers, Marcia K.; Han, Wen-Jui; Waldfogel, Jane; Garfinkel, Irwin.

    In: Social Service Review, Vol. 75, No. 1, 01.03.2001, p. 29-58.

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    Meyers, Marcia K. ; Han, Wen-Jui ; Waldfogel, Jane ; Garfinkel, Irwin. / Child care in the wake of welfare reform : The impact of government subsidies on the economic well-being of single-mother families. In: Social Service Review. 2001 ; Vol. 75, No. 1. pp. 29-58.
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