Characterizing e-cigarette use in veteran smokers with mental health conditions

John Wang, Erin Rogers, Steven Fu, Amy Gravely, Siamak Noorbaloochi, Scott Sherman

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

IntroductionThe use of electronic cigarettes (e-cigarettes) in smokers with mental health conditions (MHC) is not well understood.AimsThis study aims to compare e-cigarette users and non-users among veteran smokers with MHC to characterize differences in smoking behavior, motivation to quit, psychological distress, primary psychiatric diagnosis, and other factors.MethodsBaseline survey data were used from a randomized smoking cessation trial enrolling smokers with MHC from four Veterans Health Administration hospitals. Participants were categorized as current, former (having ever tried an e-cigarette), or never e-cigarette users. Pearson's χ2 and ANOVA Type-3 F-tests were used to test the bivariate associations between e-cigarette use and variables measured.ResultsAmong 1,836 participants, mean age was 58 years (STD ± 12.5), 87% were male, 15% were current e-cigarette users (n = 275), and 27% were former users (n = 503). Sixty-five percent of e-cigarette users reported 'wanting to quit smoking' as a primary reason. Mean readiness to quit smoking (1-10) was 7.2, 6.8, and 6.4 for current, former, and never e-cigarette users, respectively (P = 0.0002). Sixty-three percent of current and former users and 55% of never-users reported some mental distress on Kessler-6 scale (P = 0.0003, OR = 1.4, 95% CI 1.1-1.7). A primary psychiatric diagnosis of alcohol or substance use disorder was recorded for 50% of current or former users and 60% of never-users (P = 0.0003, OR = 0.69, 95% CI 0.56-0.84).ConclusionsE-cigarette users were more ready to quit and most often reported using e-cigarettes to assist with quitting. E-cigarette users had more psychological distress and were less likely to have substance use disorders as their primary psychiatric diagnosis.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalJournal of Smoking Cessation
DOIs
StateAccepted/In press - Jan 1 2019

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Veterans
Mental Health
Mental Disorders
Smoking
Substance-Related Disorders
Electronic Cigarettes
Psychology
Veterans Health
United States Department of Veterans Affairs
Smoking Cessation
Sexually Transmitted Diseases
Tobacco Products
Motivation
Analysis of Variance
Alcohols

Keywords

  • E-cigarette
  • mental health
  • veteran

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Psychiatry and Mental health

Cite this

Characterizing e-cigarette use in veteran smokers with mental health conditions. / Wang, John; Rogers, Erin; Fu, Steven; Gravely, Amy; Noorbaloochi, Siamak; Sherman, Scott.

In: Journal of Smoking Cessation, 01.01.2019.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Wang, John ; Rogers, Erin ; Fu, Steven ; Gravely, Amy ; Noorbaloochi, Siamak ; Sherman, Scott. / Characterizing e-cigarette use in veteran smokers with mental health conditions. In: Journal of Smoking Cessation. 2019.
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abstract = "IntroductionThe use of electronic cigarettes (e-cigarettes) in smokers with mental health conditions (MHC) is not well understood.AimsThis study aims to compare e-cigarette users and non-users among veteran smokers with MHC to characterize differences in smoking behavior, motivation to quit, psychological distress, primary psychiatric diagnosis, and other factors.MethodsBaseline survey data were used from a randomized smoking cessation trial enrolling smokers with MHC from four Veterans Health Administration hospitals. Participants were categorized as current, former (having ever tried an e-cigarette), or never e-cigarette users. Pearson's χ2 and ANOVA Type-3 F-tests were used to test the bivariate associations between e-cigarette use and variables measured.ResultsAmong 1,836 participants, mean age was 58 years (STD ± 12.5), 87{\%} were male, 15{\%} were current e-cigarette users (n = 275), and 27{\%} were former users (n = 503). Sixty-five percent of e-cigarette users reported 'wanting to quit smoking' as a primary reason. Mean readiness to quit smoking (1-10) was 7.2, 6.8, and 6.4 for current, former, and never e-cigarette users, respectively (P = 0.0002). Sixty-three percent of current and former users and 55{\%} of never-users reported some mental distress on Kessler-6 scale (P = 0.0003, OR = 1.4, 95{\%} CI 1.1-1.7). A primary psychiatric diagnosis of alcohol or substance use disorder was recorded for 50{\%} of current or former users and 60{\%} of never-users (P = 0.0003, OR = 0.69, 95{\%} CI 0.56-0.84).ConclusionsE-cigarette users were more ready to quit and most often reported using e-cigarettes to assist with quitting. E-cigarette users had more psychological distress and were less likely to have substance use disorders as their primary psychiatric diagnosis.",
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N2 - IntroductionThe use of electronic cigarettes (e-cigarettes) in smokers with mental health conditions (MHC) is not well understood.AimsThis study aims to compare e-cigarette users and non-users among veteran smokers with MHC to characterize differences in smoking behavior, motivation to quit, psychological distress, primary psychiatric diagnosis, and other factors.MethodsBaseline survey data were used from a randomized smoking cessation trial enrolling smokers with MHC from four Veterans Health Administration hospitals. Participants were categorized as current, former (having ever tried an e-cigarette), or never e-cigarette users. Pearson's χ2 and ANOVA Type-3 F-tests were used to test the bivariate associations between e-cigarette use and variables measured.ResultsAmong 1,836 participants, mean age was 58 years (STD ± 12.5), 87% were male, 15% were current e-cigarette users (n = 275), and 27% were former users (n = 503). Sixty-five percent of e-cigarette users reported 'wanting to quit smoking' as a primary reason. Mean readiness to quit smoking (1-10) was 7.2, 6.8, and 6.4 for current, former, and never e-cigarette users, respectively (P = 0.0002). Sixty-three percent of current and former users and 55% of never-users reported some mental distress on Kessler-6 scale (P = 0.0003, OR = 1.4, 95% CI 1.1-1.7). A primary psychiatric diagnosis of alcohol or substance use disorder was recorded for 50% of current or former users and 60% of never-users (P = 0.0003, OR = 0.69, 95% CI 0.56-0.84).ConclusionsE-cigarette users were more ready to quit and most often reported using e-cigarettes to assist with quitting. E-cigarette users had more psychological distress and were less likely to have substance use disorders as their primary psychiatric diagnosis.

AB - IntroductionThe use of electronic cigarettes (e-cigarettes) in smokers with mental health conditions (MHC) is not well understood.AimsThis study aims to compare e-cigarette users and non-users among veteran smokers with MHC to characterize differences in smoking behavior, motivation to quit, psychological distress, primary psychiatric diagnosis, and other factors.MethodsBaseline survey data were used from a randomized smoking cessation trial enrolling smokers with MHC from four Veterans Health Administration hospitals. Participants were categorized as current, former (having ever tried an e-cigarette), or never e-cigarette users. Pearson's χ2 and ANOVA Type-3 F-tests were used to test the bivariate associations between e-cigarette use and variables measured.ResultsAmong 1,836 participants, mean age was 58 years (STD ± 12.5), 87% were male, 15% were current e-cigarette users (n = 275), and 27% were former users (n = 503). Sixty-five percent of e-cigarette users reported 'wanting to quit smoking' as a primary reason. Mean readiness to quit smoking (1-10) was 7.2, 6.8, and 6.4 for current, former, and never e-cigarette users, respectively (P = 0.0002). Sixty-three percent of current and former users and 55% of never-users reported some mental distress on Kessler-6 scale (P = 0.0003, OR = 1.4, 95% CI 1.1-1.7). A primary psychiatric diagnosis of alcohol or substance use disorder was recorded for 50% of current or former users and 60% of never-users (P = 0.0003, OR = 0.69, 95% CI 0.56-0.84).ConclusionsE-cigarette users were more ready to quit and most often reported using e-cigarettes to assist with quitting. E-cigarette users had more psychological distress and were less likely to have substance use disorders as their primary psychiatric diagnosis.

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