Characterization and Utilization of Preferred Interests: A Survey of Adults on the Autism Spectrum

Kristie Koenig, Lauren Hough Williams

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

This descriptive study examined the role that preferred interests played in an adult population with autism spectrum disorders—how preferred interests are viewed retrospectively during childhood, as well as how adults on the spectrum have incorporated these interests into their current lives. Results showed that participants have a positive view of preferred interests, view preferred interests as a way to mitigate anxiety, and engage in vocational and avocational pursuits around their preferred interests. Findings support a strength-based view of preferred interests with the majority of participants articulating that their areas of interest were positive, beneficial, and should be encouraged.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1-12
Number of pages12
JournalOccupational Therapy in Mental Health
DOIs
StateAccepted/In press - Jan 31 2017

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Autistic Disorder
Anxiety
Population
Surveys and Questionnaires

Keywords

  • Asperger syndrome
  • autism
  • occupations
  • preferred interests
  • quality of life
  • autism spectrum disorder
  • ASD
  • occupational therapy

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Applied Psychology
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health
  • Psychiatry and Mental health

Cite this

Characterization and Utilization of Preferred Interests : A Survey of Adults on the Autism Spectrum. / Koenig, Kristie; Hough Williams, Lauren.

In: Occupational Therapy in Mental Health, 31.01.2017, p. 1-12.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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