Characteristics of Adults Who Switched From Cigarette Smoking to E-cigarettes

Su Hyun Park, Dustin Duncan, Omar El Shahawy, Lily Lee, Jenni A. Shearston, Kosuke Tamura, Scott Sherman, Michael Weitzman

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Introduction: Because of the rapidly increasing use of electronic cigarettes (e-cigarettes), this study aimed to investigate the individual characteristics and state-level prevalence of U.S. adults who have switched to e-cigarettes from traditional cigarettes. Methods: Data from the 2012-2013 and 2013-2014 National Adult Tobacco Surveys were analyzed in 2016. Relative percent change in switching was estimated, and the state-specific prevalence of adults who switched to e-cigarettes from traditional cigarettes was calculated and mapped. Multivariate logistic regression was conducted to examine how switching varied by sociodemographic subgroups and region. Results: Overall, the number of individuals who switched from traditional cigarettes to e-cigarettes increased by approximately 100% over the 1-year interval. Significant increases were found among a number of sociodemographics and regions. Multivariate logistic regression analyses showed that young adults and those living in the South and West were more likely to switch to e-cigarettes, compared to former smokers who did not switch. Compared with current dual users, those with higher education and those who were not single were more likely to switch to e-cigarettes. The state with the highest prevalence of switching was New Mexico (7.3%), whereas Connecticut had the lowest prevalence (0.8 %) among former smokers. Conclusions: There is an increase in the progression from traditional cigarette use to e-cigarette use. Further research is warranted to determine whether this change continues and facilitates cigarette smoking cessation as a possible public health benefit and opportunity to save lives rather than constitutes a potential threat to public health.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalAmerican Journal of Preventive Medicine
DOIs
StateAccepted/In press - 2017

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Smoking
Tobacco Products
Public Health
Logistic Models
Insurance Benefits
Smoking Cessation
Electronic Cigarettes
Tobacco
Young Adult
Regression Analysis
Education
Research

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Epidemiology
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

Cite this

Characteristics of Adults Who Switched From Cigarette Smoking to E-cigarettes. / Park, Su Hyun; Duncan, Dustin; Shahawy, Omar El; Lee, Lily; Shearston, Jenni A.; Tamura, Kosuke; Sherman, Scott; Weitzman, Michael.

In: American Journal of Preventive Medicine, 2017.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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abstract = "Introduction: Because of the rapidly increasing use of electronic cigarettes (e-cigarettes), this study aimed to investigate the individual characteristics and state-level prevalence of U.S. adults who have switched to e-cigarettes from traditional cigarettes. Methods: Data from the 2012-2013 and 2013-2014 National Adult Tobacco Surveys were analyzed in 2016. Relative percent change in switching was estimated, and the state-specific prevalence of adults who switched to e-cigarettes from traditional cigarettes was calculated and mapped. Multivariate logistic regression was conducted to examine how switching varied by sociodemographic subgroups and region. Results: Overall, the number of individuals who switched from traditional cigarettes to e-cigarettes increased by approximately 100{\%} over the 1-year interval. Significant increases were found among a number of sociodemographics and regions. Multivariate logistic regression analyses showed that young adults and those living in the South and West were more likely to switch to e-cigarettes, compared to former smokers who did not switch. Compared with current dual users, those with higher education and those who were not single were more likely to switch to e-cigarettes. The state with the highest prevalence of switching was New Mexico (7.3{\%}), whereas Connecticut had the lowest prevalence (0.8 {\%}) among former smokers. Conclusions: There is an increase in the progression from traditional cigarette use to e-cigarette use. Further research is warranted to determine whether this change continues and facilitates cigarette smoking cessation as a possible public health benefit and opportunity to save lives rather than constitutes a potential threat to public health.",
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AU - Tamura, Kosuke

AU - Sherman, Scott

AU - Weitzman, Michael

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