Changing health behaviors to improve health outcomes after angioplasty: A randomized trial of net present value versus future value risk communication

M. E. Charlson, J. C. Peterson, C. Boutin-Foster, W. M. Briggs, G. G. Ogedegbe, C. E. McCulloch, J. Hollenberg, C. Wong, J. P. Allegrante

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Patients who have undergone angioplasty experience difficulty modifying at-risk behaviors for subsequent cardiac events. The purpose of this study was to test whether an innovative approach to framing of risk, based on 'net present value' economic theory, would be more effective in behavioral intervention than the standard 'future value approach' in reducing cardiovascular morbidity and mortality following angioplasty. At baseline, all patients completed a health assessment, recieved an individualized risk profile and selected risk factors for modification. The intervention randomized patients into two varying methods for illustrating positive effects of behavior change. For the experimental group, each selected risk factor was assigned a numeric biologic age (the net present value) that approximated the relative potential to improve current health status and quality of life when modifying that risk factor. In the control group, risk reduction was framed as the value of preventing future health problems. Ninety-four percent of patients completed 2-year follow-up. There was no difference between the rates of death, stroke, myocardial infarction, Class II-IV angina or severe ischemia (on non-invasive testing) between the net present value group and the future value group. Our results show that a net present risk communication intervention did not result in significant differences in health outcomes.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)826-839
Number of pages14
JournalHealth Education Research
Volume23
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 2008

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risk communication
Health Behavior
health behavior
Angioplasty
Communication
present
Health
health
Values
Mortality
Risk Reduction Behavior
Group
Risk-Taking
Health Status
value theory
Ischemia
Stroke
Myocardial Infarction
Economics
Quality of Life

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health
  • Education

Cite this

Changing health behaviors to improve health outcomes after angioplasty : A randomized trial of net present value versus future value risk communication. / Charlson, M. E.; Peterson, J. C.; Boutin-Foster, C.; Briggs, W. M.; Ogedegbe, G. G.; McCulloch, C. E.; Hollenberg, J.; Wong, C.; Allegrante, J. P.

In: Health Education Research, Vol. 23, No. 5, 10.2008, p. 826-839.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Charlson, ME, Peterson, JC, Boutin-Foster, C, Briggs, WM, Ogedegbe, GG, McCulloch, CE, Hollenberg, J, Wong, C & Allegrante, JP 2008, 'Changing health behaviors to improve health outcomes after angioplasty: A randomized trial of net present value versus future value risk communication', Health Education Research, vol. 23, no. 5, pp. 826-839. https://doi.org/10.1093/her/cym068
Charlson, M. E. ; Peterson, J. C. ; Boutin-Foster, C. ; Briggs, W. M. ; Ogedegbe, G. G. ; McCulloch, C. E. ; Hollenberg, J. ; Wong, C. ; Allegrante, J. P. / Changing health behaviors to improve health outcomes after angioplasty : A randomized trial of net present value versus future value risk communication. In: Health Education Research. 2008 ; Vol. 23, No. 5. pp. 826-839.
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