Changes in mental health financing since 1971: Implications for policymakers and patients

Richard G. Frank, Sharon Glied

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

Abstract

The aggregate share that total mental health spending claims of national income has been stable over the past thirty-five years. This stability is a consequence of immense change - new organizational technologies, new treatment technologies, and a growing supply of providers. Aggregate spending stability has been accompanied by major shifts in the composition of financing, which have tended to spread the costs of mental illness more broadly but also have led to fragmentation in public responsibility for people with mental illnesses. Recent developments suggest that financing could be further constrained in the future, even as fragmentation continues to increase.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)601-613
Number of pages13
JournalHealth Affairs
Volume25
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - May 2006

Fingerprint

Healthcare Financing
mental illness
fragmentation
Mental Health
mental health
Technology
Organizational Innovation
national income
Cost of Illness
new technology
supply
responsibility
costs
Therapeutics

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Nursing(all)
  • Health(social science)
  • Health Professions(all)
  • Health Policy

Cite this

Changes in mental health financing since 1971 : Implications for policymakers and patients. / Frank, Richard G.; Glied, Sharon.

In: Health Affairs, Vol. 25, No. 3, 05.2006, p. 601-613.

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

@article{b4c7b2c23a5242a9a442a3c0d396a9a7,
title = "Changes in mental health financing since 1971: Implications for policymakers and patients",
abstract = "The aggregate share that total mental health spending claims of national income has been stable over the past thirty-five years. This stability is a consequence of immense change - new organizational technologies, new treatment technologies, and a growing supply of providers. Aggregate spending stability has been accompanied by major shifts in the composition of financing, which have tended to spread the costs of mental illness more broadly but also have led to fragmentation in public responsibility for people with mental illnesses. Recent developments suggest that financing could be further constrained in the future, even as fragmentation continues to increase.",
author = "Frank, {Richard G.} and Sharon Glied",
year = "2006",
month = "5",
doi = "10.1377/hlthaff.25.3.601",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "25",
pages = "601--613",
journal = "Health Affairs",
issn = "0278-2715",
publisher = "Project Hope",
number = "3",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Changes in mental health financing since 1971

T2 - Implications for policymakers and patients

AU - Frank, Richard G.

AU - Glied, Sharon

PY - 2006/5

Y1 - 2006/5

N2 - The aggregate share that total mental health spending claims of national income has been stable over the past thirty-five years. This stability is a consequence of immense change - new organizational technologies, new treatment technologies, and a growing supply of providers. Aggregate spending stability has been accompanied by major shifts in the composition of financing, which have tended to spread the costs of mental illness more broadly but also have led to fragmentation in public responsibility for people with mental illnesses. Recent developments suggest that financing could be further constrained in the future, even as fragmentation continues to increase.

AB - The aggregate share that total mental health spending claims of national income has been stable over the past thirty-five years. This stability is a consequence of immense change - new organizational technologies, new treatment technologies, and a growing supply of providers. Aggregate spending stability has been accompanied by major shifts in the composition of financing, which have tended to spread the costs of mental illness more broadly but also have led to fragmentation in public responsibility for people with mental illnesses. Recent developments suggest that financing could be further constrained in the future, even as fragmentation continues to increase.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=33744757993&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=33744757993&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1377/hlthaff.25.3.601

DO - 10.1377/hlthaff.25.3.601

M3 - Review article

C2 - 16684723

AN - SCOPUS:33744757993

VL - 25

SP - 601

EP - 613

JO - Health Affairs

JF - Health Affairs

SN - 0278-2715

IS - 3

ER -