Change in Diabetes Prevalence and Control among New York City Adults: NYC Health and Nutrition Examination Surveys 2004–2014

Lorna Thorpe, Rania Kanchi, Shadi Chamany, Jesica S. Rodriguez-Lopez, Claudia Chernov, Amy Freeman, Sharon E. Perlman

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

National examination surveys provide trend information on diabetes prevalence, diagnoses, and control. Few localities have access to such information. Using a similar design as the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES), two NYC Health and Nutrition Examination Surveys (NYC HANES) were conducted over a decade, recruiting adults ≥ 20 years using household probability samples (n = 1808 in 2004; n = 1246 in 2013–2014) and physical exam survey methods benchmarked against NHANES. Participants had diagnosed diabetes if told by a health provider they had diabetes, and undiagnosed diabetes if they had no diagnosis but a fasting plasma glucose ≥ 126 mg/dl or A1C ≥ 6.5%. We found that between 2004 and 2014, total diabetes prevalence (diagnosed and undiagnosed) in NYC increased from 13.4 to 16.0% (P = 0.089). In 2013–2014, racial/ethnic disparities in diabetes burden had widened; diabetes was highest among Asians (24.6%), and prevalence was significantly lower among non-Hispanic white adults (7.7%) compared to that among other racial/ethnic groups (P < 0.001). Among adults with diabetes, the proportion of cases diagnosed increased from 68.3 to 77.3% (P = 0.234), and diagnosed cases with very poor control (A1C > 9%), decreased from 26.9 to 18.0% (P = 0.269), though both were non-significant. While local racial/ethnic disparities in diabetes prevalence persist, findings suggest modest improvements in diabetes diagnosis and management.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1-6
Number of pages6
JournalJournal of Urban Health
DOIs
StateAccepted/In press - Jul 9 2018

Fingerprint

Nutrition Surveys
chronic illness
nutrition
examination
Health
health
Sampling Studies
Access to Information
Ethnic Groups
Fasting
Glucose
ethnic group
Surveys and Questionnaires
trend

Keywords

  • Biomonitoring
  • Control diabetes
  • Diabetes
  • Health inequalities

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Health(social science)
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

Cite this

Change in Diabetes Prevalence and Control among New York City Adults : NYC Health and Nutrition Examination Surveys 2004–2014. / Thorpe, Lorna; Kanchi, Rania; Chamany, Shadi; Rodriguez-Lopez, Jesica S.; Chernov, Claudia; Freeman, Amy; Perlman, Sharon E.

In: Journal of Urban Health, 09.07.2018, p. 1-6.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Thorpe, Lorna ; Kanchi, Rania ; Chamany, Shadi ; Rodriguez-Lopez, Jesica S. ; Chernov, Claudia ; Freeman, Amy ; Perlman, Sharon E. / Change in Diabetes Prevalence and Control among New York City Adults : NYC Health and Nutrition Examination Surveys 2004–2014. In: Journal of Urban Health. 2018 ; pp. 1-6.
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