Cerebral processing of proper and common nouns: Perception and production following left hemisphere damage

Seung Yun Yang, Diana Van Lancker Sidtis

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

The goal of this study was to further investigate hemispheric specialization for proper and common nouns by examining the ability of individuals with left hemisphere damage (LHD) to perceive and verbally reproduce famous names and matched common names compared with the performance of matched healthy controls (HC). Ten individuals with LHD due to stroke and 16 age- and education-matched HC completed recognition and production tasks of famous proper and common nouns. All tasks were designed as split-visual field experiments, modelled after the study done by Ohnesorge and Van Lancker. Results contribute to a better understanding of hemispheric roles in perception and production of famous proper nouns, suggesting that (1) both hemispheres can recognize famous proper nouns, possibly due to a right hemisphere role in personal relevance and (2) production of proper nouns as well as common nouns is associated with left hemisphere.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)319-332
Number of pages14
JournalClinical Linguistics and Phonetics
Volume29
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 1 2015

Fingerprint

Names
damages
Cerebral Dominance
Aptitude
Visual Fields
Stroke
stroke
Education
specialization
experiment
ability
performance
Proper Nouns
Common Noun
Left-hemisphere Damage
education
Recognition (Psychology)

Keywords

  • Aphasia
  • Left hemisphere
  • Personal relevance
  • Proper noun
  • Right hemisphere

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Speech and Hearing
  • Linguistics and Language
  • Language and Linguistics

Cite this

Cerebral processing of proper and common nouns : Perception and production following left hemisphere damage. / Yang, Seung Yun; Van Lancker Sidtis, Diana.

In: Clinical Linguistics and Phonetics, Vol. 29, No. 4, 01.04.2015, p. 319-332.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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