Cellular and molecular mechanisms of bone remodeling

Liza J. Raggatt, Nicola Partridge

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Physiological bone remodeling is a highly coordinated process responsible for bone resorption and formation and is necessary to repair damaged bone and to maintain mineral homeostasis. In addition to the traditional bone cells (osteoclasts, osteoblasts, and osteocytes) that are necessary for bone remodeling, several immunecells have also been implicated in bone disease. This minireview discusses physiological bone remodeling, outlining the traditional bone biology dogma in light of emerging osteoimmunology data. Specifically discussed in detail are the cellular and molecular mechanisms of bone remodeling, including events that orchestrate the five sequential phases of bone remodeling: activation, resorption, reversal, formation, and termination.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)25103-25108
Number of pages6
JournalJournal of Biological Chemistry
Volume285
Issue number33
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 13 2010

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Bone Remodeling
Bone
Bone and Bones
Osteocytes
Bone Diseases
Osteoclasts
Bone Resorption
Osteoblasts
Osteogenesis
Minerals
Homeostasis
Repair
Chemical activation

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Biochemistry
  • Cell Biology
  • Molecular Biology

Cite this

Cellular and molecular mechanisms of bone remodeling. / Raggatt, Liza J.; Partridge, Nicola.

In: Journal of Biological Chemistry, Vol. 285, No. 33, 13.08.2010, p. 25103-25108.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Raggatt, Liza J. ; Partridge, Nicola. / Cellular and molecular mechanisms of bone remodeling. In: Journal of Biological Chemistry. 2010 ; Vol. 285, No. 33. pp. 25103-25108.
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