Case managers speak out: Responding to depression in community long-term care

Michelle Munson, Enola Proctor, Nancy Morrow-Howell, Nicole Fedoravicius, Norma Ware

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Objective: This study sought to understand how case managers in one publicly funded health and social service system, community long-term care, understand and address depression among their clients. Methods: Four focus groups with a total of 18 case managers were conducted. Case managers were asked a series of questions about their perspectives on the recognition and treatment of depression, including subthreshold depression, in community long-term care. Results: Case managers perceived addressing depression as complex because of competing demands. Furthermore, case managers perceived conflict between their current role and what it would take to expand their role to include addressing depression. Conclusions: Case managers suggested that in order to successfully improve the detection and treatment of depression in community long-term care, systemic changes, such as increased support and training, may be necessary, along with a shift in the professional role of case managers.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1124-1127
Number of pages4
JournalPsychiatric Services
Volume58
Issue number8
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 2007

Fingerprint

Long-Term Care
manager
Depression
community
Professional Role
Training Support
Case Managers
Focus Groups
Social Work
mobile social services
Health Services
health service
Therapeutics
Group

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Psychiatry and Mental health
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health
  • Health(social science)
  • Health Professions(all)

Cite this

Case managers speak out : Responding to depression in community long-term care. / Munson, Michelle; Proctor, Enola; Morrow-Howell, Nancy; Fedoravicius, Nicole; Ware, Norma.

In: Psychiatric Services, Vol. 58, No. 8, 08.2007, p. 1124-1127.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Munson, M, Proctor, E, Morrow-Howell, N, Fedoravicius, N & Ware, N 2007, 'Case managers speak out: Responding to depression in community long-term care', Psychiatric Services, vol. 58, no. 8, pp. 1124-1127. https://doi.org/10.1176/appi.ps.58.8.1124
Munson, Michelle ; Proctor, Enola ; Morrow-Howell, Nancy ; Fedoravicius, Nicole ; Ware, Norma. / Case managers speak out : Responding to depression in community long-term care. In: Psychiatric Services. 2007 ; Vol. 58, No. 8. pp. 1124-1127.
@article{af8cce8da3cc47c2b7fb668ff47dbddf,
title = "Case managers speak out: Responding to depression in community long-term care",
abstract = "Objective: This study sought to understand how case managers in one publicly funded health and social service system, community long-term care, understand and address depression among their clients. Methods: Four focus groups with a total of 18 case managers were conducted. Case managers were asked a series of questions about their perspectives on the recognition and treatment of depression, including subthreshold depression, in community long-term care. Results: Case managers perceived addressing depression as complex because of competing demands. Furthermore, case managers perceived conflict between their current role and what it would take to expand their role to include addressing depression. Conclusions: Case managers suggested that in order to successfully improve the detection and treatment of depression in community long-term care, systemic changes, such as increased support and training, may be necessary, along with a shift in the professional role of case managers.",
author = "Michelle Munson and Enola Proctor and Nancy Morrow-Howell and Nicole Fedoravicius and Norma Ware",
year = "2007",
month = "8",
doi = "10.1176/appi.ps.58.8.1124",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "58",
pages = "1124--1127",
journal = "Psychiatric Services",
issn = "1075-2730",
publisher = "American Psychiatric Association",
number = "8",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Case managers speak out

T2 - Responding to depression in community long-term care

AU - Munson, Michelle

AU - Proctor, Enola

AU - Morrow-Howell, Nancy

AU - Fedoravicius, Nicole

AU - Ware, Norma

PY - 2007/8

Y1 - 2007/8

N2 - Objective: This study sought to understand how case managers in one publicly funded health and social service system, community long-term care, understand and address depression among their clients. Methods: Four focus groups with a total of 18 case managers were conducted. Case managers were asked a series of questions about their perspectives on the recognition and treatment of depression, including subthreshold depression, in community long-term care. Results: Case managers perceived addressing depression as complex because of competing demands. Furthermore, case managers perceived conflict between their current role and what it would take to expand their role to include addressing depression. Conclusions: Case managers suggested that in order to successfully improve the detection and treatment of depression in community long-term care, systemic changes, such as increased support and training, may be necessary, along with a shift in the professional role of case managers.

AB - Objective: This study sought to understand how case managers in one publicly funded health and social service system, community long-term care, understand and address depression among their clients. Methods: Four focus groups with a total of 18 case managers were conducted. Case managers were asked a series of questions about their perspectives on the recognition and treatment of depression, including subthreshold depression, in community long-term care. Results: Case managers perceived addressing depression as complex because of competing demands. Furthermore, case managers perceived conflict between their current role and what it would take to expand their role to include addressing depression. Conclusions: Case managers suggested that in order to successfully improve the detection and treatment of depression in community long-term care, systemic changes, such as increased support and training, may be necessary, along with a shift in the professional role of case managers.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=34548107023&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=34548107023&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1176/appi.ps.58.8.1124

DO - 10.1176/appi.ps.58.8.1124

M3 - Article

C2 - 17664526

AN - SCOPUS:34548107023

VL - 58

SP - 1124

EP - 1127

JO - Psychiatric Services

JF - Psychiatric Services

SN - 1075-2730

IS - 8

ER -