Can child care assistance in welfare and employment programs support the employment of low-income families?

Lisa Gennetian, Danielle A. Crosby, Aletha C. Huston, Edward D. Lowe

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

Abstract

Policymakers have long recognized child care as a key ingredient in low-income parents' employability. We examine the effects of expansions in child care policies that were bundled with a mix of employment-related policies and implemented as part of several random assignment studies on families' child care access and cost. Almost all of these welfare and employment programs increased employment and led to concomitant increases in the use of child care, especially paid child care. Only the programs that also expanded access or affordability of child care consistently increased the use of child care subsidies and reduced out-of-pocket costs to parents, allowing parents to purchase center-based care. With one exception, such programs had small effects on employment-related child care problems, suggesting that broader and more generous targeting of child care assistance may be important for achieving the goal of enhancing the stability of employment among low-income families.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)723-743
Number of pages21
JournalJournal of Policy Analysis and Management
Volume23
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 1 2004

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child care
low income
assistance
welfare
parents
Low-income families
Child care
effect on employment
employability
costs
subsidy
purchase

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Business, Management and Accounting(all)
  • Sociology and Political Science
  • Public Administration

Cite this

Can child care assistance in welfare and employment programs support the employment of low-income families? / Gennetian, Lisa; Crosby, Danielle A.; Huston, Aletha C.; Lowe, Edward D.

In: Journal of Policy Analysis and Management, Vol. 23, No. 4, 01.09.2004, p. 723-743.

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

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