Can a Parenting Intervention to Prevent Early Conduct Problems Interrupt Girls’ Risk for Intimate Partner Violence 10 Years Later?

Miriam K. Ehrensaft, Heather Knous Westfall, Phyllis Holditch Niolon, Thailyn Lopez, Dimitra Kamboukos, Keng Yen Huang, Laurie Miller Brotman

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

This study tests whether a parenting intervention for families of preschoolers at risk for conduct problems can prevent later risk for intimate partner violence (IPV). Ninety-nine preschoolers at familial risk for conduct problems were randomly assigned to intervention or control conditions. Ten years later, 45 preschoolers and 43 of their siblings completed an assessment of their romantic relationships, including measures of physical and psychological IPV. The study focuses on the 54 females, including targets (n = 27) and siblings (n = 27) who participated in a 10-year follow-up (M age = 16.5, SD = 5.2, range = 10–28). Using an intent-to-treat (ITT) design, multivariate regressions suggest that females from families randomly assigned to intervention in early childhood scored lower than those in the control condition on perceptions of dating violence as normative, beliefs about IPV prevalence, exposure to IPV in their own peer group, and expected sanction behaviors for IPV perpetration and victimization. Findings suggest that early parenting intervention may reduce association of high-risk females with aggressive peers and partners in adolescence.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1-10
Number of pages10
JournalPrevention Science
DOIs
StateAccepted/In press - Sep 7 2017

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Parenting
Siblings
Peer Group
Crime Victims
Intimate Partner Violence
Psychology

Keywords

  • Adolescent
  • Behavior problems
  • Conduct problems
  • Intimate partner violence
  • Prevention

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

Cite this

Can a Parenting Intervention to Prevent Early Conduct Problems Interrupt Girls’ Risk for Intimate Partner Violence 10 Years Later? / Ehrensaft, Miriam K.; Westfall, Heather Knous; Niolon, Phyllis Holditch; Lopez, Thailyn; Kamboukos, Dimitra; Huang, Keng Yen; Brotman, Laurie Miller.

In: Prevention Science, 07.09.2017, p. 1-10.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Ehrensaft, Miriam K. ; Westfall, Heather Knous ; Niolon, Phyllis Holditch ; Lopez, Thailyn ; Kamboukos, Dimitra ; Huang, Keng Yen ; Brotman, Laurie Miller. / Can a Parenting Intervention to Prevent Early Conduct Problems Interrupt Girls’ Risk for Intimate Partner Violence 10 Years Later?. In: Prevention Science. 2017 ; pp. 1-10.
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