Calorie labeling and food choices

a first look at the effects on low-income people in New York City.

Brian D. Elbel, Rogan Kersh, Victoria L. Brescoll, L. Beth Dixon

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

We examined the influence of menu calorie labels on fast food choices in the wake of New York City's labeling mandate. Receipts and survey responses were collected from 1,156 adults at fast-food restaurants in low-income, minority New York communities. These were compared to a sample in Newark, New Jersey, a city that had not introduced menu labeling. We found that 27.7 percent who saw calorie labeling in New York said the information influenced their choices. However, we did not detect a change in calories purchased after the introduction of calorie labeling. We encourage more research on menu labeling and greater attention to evaluating and implementing other obesity-related policies.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalHealth affairs (Project Hope)
Volume28
Issue number6
StatePublished - Nov 2009

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Food Labeling
Fast Foods
Restaurants
Obesity
Research
Surveys and Questionnaires

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Health Policy

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Calorie labeling and food choices : a first look at the effects on low-income people in New York City. / Elbel, Brian D.; Kersh, Rogan; Brescoll, Victoria L.; Dixon, L. Beth.

In: Health affairs (Project Hope), Vol. 28, No. 6, 11.2009.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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