Calorie Intake, Sugar-Sweetened Beverage Consumption, and Obesity Among New York City Adults: Findings from a 2013 Population Study Using Dietary Recalls

Ryan Ruff, Ali Akhund, Tamar Adjoian, Susan M. Kansagra

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Obesity and overweight-obesity have contributed to increases in early mortality and noncommunicable disease incidence. The consumption of sugar-sweetened beverages (SSBs) is linked to obesity, weight gain, and metabolic syndrome. To further explore this relationship in a large urban environment, we assessed disparities in calorie intake between SSB and non-SSB consumers and determine the association between varying SSB consumption, obesity, and overweight-obesity using data from a 2013 representative dietary survey conducted in New York City. Results show that adult SSB drinkers consume 193 kcal/day from SSBs, approximately 10 % of daily caloric needs. Compared to non-SSB drinkers, those who consume SSBs have a 572 kcal greater daily intake. Total calorie differences are due to greater SSB calorie and food calorie consumption. Among SSB consumers, each 10-oz increase in SSB consumption is associated with a greater likelihood of obesity (OR 1.62, 95 % CI 1.05, 2.05) and overweight-obesity (OR 2.23, 95 % CI 1.31, 3.80). Additionally, each 10-kcal SSB increase is related to obesity (OR 1.04, 95 % CI 1.01, 1.08) and overweight-obesity (OR 1.07, 95 % CI 1.02, 1.11).

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1117-1123
Number of pages7
JournalJournal of Community Health
Volume39
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 31 2014

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Beverages
Obesity
Population
food consumption
incidence
mortality
Disease
Food and Beverages
Weight Gain
Mortality
Incidence

Keywords

  • 24-h Dietary recall
  • Obesity
  • Sugar-sweetened beverages

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health
  • Health(social science)
  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Calorie Intake, Sugar-Sweetened Beverage Consumption, and Obesity Among New York City Adults : Findings from a 2013 Population Study Using Dietary Recalls. / Ruff, Ryan; Akhund, Ali; Adjoian, Tamar; Kansagra, Susan M.

In: Journal of Community Health, Vol. 39, No. 6, 31.10.2014, p. 1117-1123.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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