Call to action on use and reimbursement for home blood pressure monitoring: A joint scientific statement from the American heart association, american society of hypertension, and preventive cardiovascular nurses association

Thomas G. Pickering, Nancy Houston Miller, Gbenga Ogedegbe, Lawrence R. Krakoff, Nancy T. Artinian, David Goff

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Home blood pressure monitoring (HBPM) overcomes many of the limitations of traditional office blood pressure (BP) measurement and is both cheaper and easier to perform than ambulatory BP monitoring. Monitors that use the oscillometric method are currently available that are accurate, reliable, easy to use, and relatively inexpensive. An increasing number of patients are using them regularly to check their BP at home, but although this has been endorsed by national and international guidelines, detailed recommendations for their use have been lacking. There is a rapidly growing literature showing that measurements taken by patients at home are often lower than readings taken in the office and closer to the average BP recorded by 24-hour ambulatory monitors, which is the BP that best predicts cardiovascular risk. Because of the larger numbers of readings that can be taken by HBPM than in the office and the elimination of the white-coat effect (the increase of BP during an office visit), home readings are more reproducible than office readings and show better correlations with measures of target organ damage. In addition, prospective studies that have used multiple home readings to express the true BP have found that home BP predicts risk better than office BP (Class IIa; Level of Evidence A). This call-to-action article makes the following recommendations: (1) It is recommended that HBPM should become a routine component of BP measurement in the majority of patients with known or suspected hypertension; (2) Patients should be advised to purchase oscillometric monitors that measure.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)299-323
Number of pages25
JournalJournal of Cardiovascular Nursing
Volume23
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 2008

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American Heart Association
Ambulatory Blood Pressure Monitoring
Nurses
Blood Pressure
Hypertension
Reading
Office Visits
Prospective Studies
Guidelines

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Advanced and Specialized Nursing
  • Cardiology and Cardiovascular Medicine
  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Call to action on use and reimbursement for home blood pressure monitoring : A joint scientific statement from the American heart association, american society of hypertension, and preventive cardiovascular nurses association. / Pickering, Thomas G.; Miller, Nancy Houston; Ogedegbe, Gbenga; Krakoff, Lawrence R.; Artinian, Nancy T.; Goff, David.

In: Journal of Cardiovascular Nursing, Vol. 23, No. 4, 07.2008, p. 299-323.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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