Building a retinal mosaic

Cell-fate decision in the fly eye

Mathias F. Wernet, Claude Desplan

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Across the animal kingdom, color discrimination is achieved by comparing the outputs of photoreceptor cells (PRs) that have different spectral sensitivities. Much remains to be understood about how the pattern of these different PRs is generated and maintained. The Drosophila eye has long provided a beautiful system for understanding various aspects of retinal-cell differentiation. Recent progress in this field is revealing that a highly ordered series of events, involving cell-cell communication, localized signaling and stochastic choices, creates a complex mosaic of PRs that is reminiscent of the human retina. Notably, several of the factors used in generating the retinal mosaic of the fruitfly have corresponding functions in vertebrates that are likely to have similar roles.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)576-584
Number of pages9
JournalTrends in Cell Biology
Volume14
Issue number10
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 2004

Fingerprint

Photoreceptor Cells
Cell Communication
Diptera
Drosophila
Vertebrates
Retina
Cell Differentiation
Color

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Cell Biology

Cite this

Building a retinal mosaic : Cell-fate decision in the fly eye. / Wernet, Mathias F.; Desplan, Claude.

In: Trends in Cell Biology, Vol. 14, No. 10, 10.2004, p. 576-584.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

@article{1745060b31e34d238b9c1fc34961c29c,
title = "Building a retinal mosaic: Cell-fate decision in the fly eye",
abstract = "Across the animal kingdom, color discrimination is achieved by comparing the outputs of photoreceptor cells (PRs) that have different spectral sensitivities. Much remains to be understood about how the pattern of these different PRs is generated and maintained. The Drosophila eye has long provided a beautiful system for understanding various aspects of retinal-cell differentiation. Recent progress in this field is revealing that a highly ordered series of events, involving cell-cell communication, localized signaling and stochastic choices, creates a complex mosaic of PRs that is reminiscent of the human retina. Notably, several of the factors used in generating the retinal mosaic of the fruitfly have corresponding functions in vertebrates that are likely to have similar roles.",
author = "Wernet, {Mathias F.} and Claude Desplan",
year = "2004",
month = "10",
doi = "10.1016/j.tcb.2004.09.007",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "14",
pages = "576--584",
journal = "Trends in Cell Biology",
issn = "0962-8924",
publisher = "Elsevier Limited",
number = "10",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Building a retinal mosaic

T2 - Cell-fate decision in the fly eye

AU - Wernet, Mathias F.

AU - Desplan, Claude

PY - 2004/10

Y1 - 2004/10

N2 - Across the animal kingdom, color discrimination is achieved by comparing the outputs of photoreceptor cells (PRs) that have different spectral sensitivities. Much remains to be understood about how the pattern of these different PRs is generated and maintained. The Drosophila eye has long provided a beautiful system for understanding various aspects of retinal-cell differentiation. Recent progress in this field is revealing that a highly ordered series of events, involving cell-cell communication, localized signaling and stochastic choices, creates a complex mosaic of PRs that is reminiscent of the human retina. Notably, several of the factors used in generating the retinal mosaic of the fruitfly have corresponding functions in vertebrates that are likely to have similar roles.

AB - Across the animal kingdom, color discrimination is achieved by comparing the outputs of photoreceptor cells (PRs) that have different spectral sensitivities. Much remains to be understood about how the pattern of these different PRs is generated and maintained. The Drosophila eye has long provided a beautiful system for understanding various aspects of retinal-cell differentiation. Recent progress in this field is revealing that a highly ordered series of events, involving cell-cell communication, localized signaling and stochastic choices, creates a complex mosaic of PRs that is reminiscent of the human retina. Notably, several of the factors used in generating the retinal mosaic of the fruitfly have corresponding functions in vertebrates that are likely to have similar roles.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=4644362933&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=4644362933&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1016/j.tcb.2004.09.007

DO - 10.1016/j.tcb.2004.09.007

M3 - Article

VL - 14

SP - 576

EP - 584

JO - Trends in Cell Biology

JF - Trends in Cell Biology

SN - 0962-8924

IS - 10

ER -