Brief coping skills treatment for cocaine abuse

12-month substance use outcomes

Damaris J. Rohsenow, Peter M. Monti, Rosemarie A. Martin, Elizabeth Michalec, David Abrams

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Patients (N = 108) in a study of cocaine-specific coping skills training (CST), which was found to reduce cocaine use during a 3-month follow-up, were followed for an additional 9 months. CST involved coping skills training in the context of high-risk situations. Control treatment used meditation-relaxation. Both were added to comprehensive private substance abuse treatment. Patients in CST who relapsed had significantly fewer cocaine use days than did the control group during the first 6 months, then both conditions did equally well. Patients in CST also drank alcohol more frequently in the last 6 months than did contrast patients but did not differ in heavy drinking days. For cocaine use outcomes, no interaction of treatment was found with gender, education, route of administration, drug use severity, sociopathy, or depression. Implications include the need to investigate different lengths and combinations of treatment.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)515-520
Number of pages6
JournalJournal of Consulting and Clinical Psychology
Volume68
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - 2000

Fingerprint

Cocaine-Related Disorders
Psychological Adaptation
Cocaine
Drug Administration Routes
Therapeutics
Meditation
Drinking
Substance-Related Disorders
Alcohols
Substance Use
Abuse
Depression
Education
Control Groups

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Clinical Psychology
  • Arts and Humanities (miscellaneous)
  • Psychiatry and Mental health

Cite this

Brief coping skills treatment for cocaine abuse : 12-month substance use outcomes. / Rohsenow, Damaris J.; Monti, Peter M.; Martin, Rosemarie A.; Michalec, Elizabeth; Abrams, David.

In: Journal of Consulting and Clinical Psychology, Vol. 68, No. 3, 2000, p. 515-520.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Rohsenow, Damaris J. ; Monti, Peter M. ; Martin, Rosemarie A. ; Michalec, Elizabeth ; Abrams, David. / Brief coping skills treatment for cocaine abuse : 12-month substance use outcomes. In: Journal of Consulting and Clinical Psychology. 2000 ; Vol. 68, No. 3. pp. 515-520.
@article{e12fbed5b85d4229ba9c16ba1f65343d,
title = "Brief coping skills treatment for cocaine abuse: 12-month substance use outcomes",
abstract = "Patients (N = 108) in a study of cocaine-specific coping skills training (CST), which was found to reduce cocaine use during a 3-month follow-up, were followed for an additional 9 months. CST involved coping skills training in the context of high-risk situations. Control treatment used meditation-relaxation. Both were added to comprehensive private substance abuse treatment. Patients in CST who relapsed had significantly fewer cocaine use days than did the control group during the first 6 months, then both conditions did equally well. Patients in CST also drank alcohol more frequently in the last 6 months than did contrast patients but did not differ in heavy drinking days. For cocaine use outcomes, no interaction of treatment was found with gender, education, route of administration, drug use severity, sociopathy, or depression. Implications include the need to investigate different lengths and combinations of treatment.",
author = "Rohsenow, {Damaris J.} and Monti, {Peter M.} and Martin, {Rosemarie A.} and Elizabeth Michalec and David Abrams",
year = "2000",
doi = "10.1037//0022-006X.68.3.515",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "68",
pages = "515--520",
journal = "Journal of Consulting and Clinical Psychology",
issn = "0022-006X",
publisher = "American Psychological Association Inc.",
number = "3",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Brief coping skills treatment for cocaine abuse

T2 - 12-month substance use outcomes

AU - Rohsenow, Damaris J.

AU - Monti, Peter M.

AU - Martin, Rosemarie A.

AU - Michalec, Elizabeth

AU - Abrams, David

PY - 2000

Y1 - 2000

N2 - Patients (N = 108) in a study of cocaine-specific coping skills training (CST), which was found to reduce cocaine use during a 3-month follow-up, were followed for an additional 9 months. CST involved coping skills training in the context of high-risk situations. Control treatment used meditation-relaxation. Both were added to comprehensive private substance abuse treatment. Patients in CST who relapsed had significantly fewer cocaine use days than did the control group during the first 6 months, then both conditions did equally well. Patients in CST also drank alcohol more frequently in the last 6 months than did contrast patients but did not differ in heavy drinking days. For cocaine use outcomes, no interaction of treatment was found with gender, education, route of administration, drug use severity, sociopathy, or depression. Implications include the need to investigate different lengths and combinations of treatment.

AB - Patients (N = 108) in a study of cocaine-specific coping skills training (CST), which was found to reduce cocaine use during a 3-month follow-up, were followed for an additional 9 months. CST involved coping skills training in the context of high-risk situations. Control treatment used meditation-relaxation. Both were added to comprehensive private substance abuse treatment. Patients in CST who relapsed had significantly fewer cocaine use days than did the control group during the first 6 months, then both conditions did equally well. Patients in CST also drank alcohol more frequently in the last 6 months than did contrast patients but did not differ in heavy drinking days. For cocaine use outcomes, no interaction of treatment was found with gender, education, route of administration, drug use severity, sociopathy, or depression. Implications include the need to investigate different lengths and combinations of treatment.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=0033820190&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=0033820190&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1037//0022-006X.68.3.515

DO - 10.1037//0022-006X.68.3.515

M3 - Article

VL - 68

SP - 515

EP - 520

JO - Journal of Consulting and Clinical Psychology

JF - Journal of Consulting and Clinical Psychology

SN - 0022-006X

IS - 3

ER -