Boys will be boys; Cows will be cows: Children's essentialist reasoning about gender categories and animal species

Marianne G. Taylor, Marjorie Rhodes, Susan A. Gelman

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Two studies (N = 456) compared the development of concepts of animal species and human gender, using a switched-at-birth reasoning task. Younger children (5- and 6-year-olds) treated animal species and human gender as equivalent; they made similar levels of category-based inferences and endorsed similar explanations for development in these 2 domains. In contrast, 10-year-olds and adults treated gender and species concepts as distinct from one another. They viewed gender-linked behavioral properties as open to environmental influence and endorsed environment-based mechanisms to explain gender development. At all ages, children demonstrated differentiated reasoning about physical and behavioral properties, although this differentiation became more stable with age. The role of psychological essentialism in guiding conceptual development is discussed.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)461-481
Number of pages21
JournalChild Development
Volume80
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 2009

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animal
gender
Parturition
Psychology

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Developmental and Educational Psychology
  • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health
  • Education

Cite this

Boys will be boys; Cows will be cows : Children's essentialist reasoning about gender categories and animal species. / Taylor, Marianne G.; Rhodes, Marjorie; Gelman, Susan A.

In: Child Development, Vol. 80, No. 2, 03.2009, p. 461-481.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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