Book Deserts: The Consequences of Income Segregation on Children’s Access to Print

Susan Neuman, Naomi Moland

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

We examine the influence of income segregation on a resource vital to young children’s development: a family’s access to books in early childhood. Income segregation reflects the growing economic segregation of neighborhoods for people living in privilege (1%) compared with those in poverty or near-poverty (20%). After describing recent demographic shifts, we examine access to print for children in six urban neighborhoods. Results indicate stark disparities in access to print for those living in concentrated poverty. We argue that such neighborhoods constitute “book deserts,” which may seriously constrain young children’s opportunities to come to school “ready to learn.”.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)126-147
Number of pages22
JournalUrban Education
Volume54
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2019

Fingerprint

desert
segregation
poverty
income
privilege
childhood
resource
economics
resources
school
book
young

Keywords

  • academic achievement
  • achievement gap
  • identity
  • literacy
  • poverty
  • reading
  • social
  • urban
  • Urban Education

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Education
  • Urban Studies

Cite this

Book Deserts : The Consequences of Income Segregation on Children’s Access to Print. / Neuman, Susan; Moland, Naomi.

In: Urban Education, Vol. 54, No. 1, 01.01.2019, p. 126-147.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

@article{e094a4473483419a84500e21705a755b,
title = "Book Deserts: The Consequences of Income Segregation on Children’s Access to Print",
abstract = "We examine the influence of income segregation on a resource vital to young children’s development: a family’s access to books in early childhood. Income segregation reflects the growing economic segregation of neighborhoods for people living in privilege (1{\%}) compared with those in poverty or near-poverty (20{\%}). After describing recent demographic shifts, we examine access to print for children in six urban neighborhoods. Results indicate stark disparities in access to print for those living in concentrated poverty. We argue that such neighborhoods constitute “book deserts,” which may seriously constrain young children’s opportunities to come to school “ready to learn.”.",
keywords = "academic achievement, achievement gap, identity, literacy, poverty, reading, social, urban, Urban Education",
author = "Susan Neuman and Naomi Moland",
year = "2019",
month = "1",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1177/0042085916654525",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "54",
pages = "126--147",
journal = "Urban Education",
issn = "0042-0859",
publisher = "SAGE Publications Inc.",
number = "1",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Book Deserts

T2 - The Consequences of Income Segregation on Children’s Access to Print

AU - Neuman, Susan

AU - Moland, Naomi

PY - 2019/1/1

Y1 - 2019/1/1

N2 - We examine the influence of income segregation on a resource vital to young children’s development: a family’s access to books in early childhood. Income segregation reflects the growing economic segregation of neighborhoods for people living in privilege (1%) compared with those in poverty or near-poverty (20%). After describing recent demographic shifts, we examine access to print for children in six urban neighborhoods. Results indicate stark disparities in access to print for those living in concentrated poverty. We argue that such neighborhoods constitute “book deserts,” which may seriously constrain young children’s opportunities to come to school “ready to learn.”.

AB - We examine the influence of income segregation on a resource vital to young children’s development: a family’s access to books in early childhood. Income segregation reflects the growing economic segregation of neighborhoods for people living in privilege (1%) compared with those in poverty or near-poverty (20%). After describing recent demographic shifts, we examine access to print for children in six urban neighborhoods. Results indicate stark disparities in access to print for those living in concentrated poverty. We argue that such neighborhoods constitute “book deserts,” which may seriously constrain young children’s opportunities to come to school “ready to learn.”.

KW - academic achievement

KW - achievement gap

KW - identity

KW - literacy

KW - poverty

KW - reading

KW - social

KW - urban

KW - Urban Education

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=85041898190&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=85041898190&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1177/0042085916654525

DO - 10.1177/0042085916654525

M3 - Article

AN - SCOPUS:85041898190

VL - 54

SP - 126

EP - 147

JO - Urban Education

JF - Urban Education

SN - 0042-0859

IS - 1

ER -