Bioresorbable fracture fixation in orthopedics

a comprehensive review. Part I. Basic science and preclinical studies.

J. A. Simon, John Ricci, P. E. Di Cesare

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Metal alloys are currently the most popular materials for manufacture of fracture-fixation devices. Two major disadvantages of these materials are their extreme stiffness, which causes stress shielding of the underlying bone, and the necessity, in a significant number of cases, of removing metallic implants after fracture healing is complete. These shortcomings of metal alloys have led to the study of bioresorbable materials for use in fracture fixation. Currently, polylactic acid, polyglycolic acid, and polydioxanone implants are available to the orthopedic surgeon for the fixation of small cancellous bone fractures. Part I of this article provides an overview of the basic science of bioresorbable materials and presents a comprehensive review of preclinical studies reported in the orthopedic literature. Clinical studies will be reviewed in Part II.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)665-671
Number of pages7
JournalAmerican journal of orthopedics (Belle Mead, N.J.)
Volume26
Issue number10
StatePublished - Oct 1997

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Fracture Fixation
Orthopedics
Polydioxanone
Metals
Polyglycolic Acid
Fracture Healing
Bone Fractures
Bone and Bones
Equipment and Supplies
Cancellous Bone
Orthopedic Surgeons
poly(lactic acid)
Clinical Studies

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Surgery

Cite this

Bioresorbable fracture fixation in orthopedics : a comprehensive review. Part I. Basic science and preclinical studies. / Simon, J. A.; Ricci, John; Di Cesare, P. E.

In: American journal of orthopedics (Belle Mead, N.J.), Vol. 26, No. 10, 10.1997, p. 665-671.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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