Bicultural Self-Efficacy Among College Students: Initial Scale Development and Mental Health Correlates

E. J R David, Sumie Okazaki, Anne Saw

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Theory and empirical research suggest that perceived self-efficacy, or one's perceived ability to perform personally significant tasks, is related to individuals' psychological well-being and mental health. Thus, the authors hypothesized that bicultural individuals' perceived ability to function competently in 2 cultures, or perceived bicultural self-efficacy, would be related positively to their psychological well-being and mental health. Three studies were conducted to develop and validate a measure of perceived bicultural self-efficacy and to explore its relationships with indices of psychological well-being and mental health. Exploratory (n = 268) and confirmatory (n = 164) factor analyses on the theoretically derived Bicultural Self-Efficacy Scale (BSES) items support a measurement model that taps into the 6 dimensions of bicultural competence proposed by T. LaFromboise, H. L. K. Coleman, and J. Gerton (1993). Furthermore, initial evidence for internal consistency (Studies 1, 2, and 3) and test-retest reliability (n = 51 Asian Americans) for each of the 6 subscales were found. Finally, perceived bicultural self-efficacy was found to be related to bicultural college students' psychological well-being and mental health. Research implications of the perceived bicultural self-efficacy construct and the potential utility of the BSES as a multidimensional measure of the construct are discussed.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)211-226
Number of pages16
JournalJournal of Counseling Psychology
Volume56
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 2009

Fingerprint

Self Efficacy
Mental Health
Students
Psychology
Aptitude
Empirical Research
Asian Americans
Reproducibility of Results
Mental Competency
Statistical Factor Analysis
Research

Keywords

  • acculturation
  • bicultural competence
  • ethnic minorities
  • mental health
  • self-efficacy

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Psychiatry and Mental health
  • Clinical Psychology
  • Social Psychology

Cite this

Bicultural Self-Efficacy Among College Students : Initial Scale Development and Mental Health Correlates. / David, E. J R; Okazaki, Sumie; Saw, Anne.

In: Journal of Counseling Psychology, Vol. 56, No. 2, 04.2009, p. 211-226.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

@article{4a903c1f42d44986b8a7e5f42659a608,
title = "Bicultural Self-Efficacy Among College Students: Initial Scale Development and Mental Health Correlates",
abstract = "Theory and empirical research suggest that perceived self-efficacy, or one's perceived ability to perform personally significant tasks, is related to individuals' psychological well-being and mental health. Thus, the authors hypothesized that bicultural individuals' perceived ability to function competently in 2 cultures, or perceived bicultural self-efficacy, would be related positively to their psychological well-being and mental health. Three studies were conducted to develop and validate a measure of perceived bicultural self-efficacy and to explore its relationships with indices of psychological well-being and mental health. Exploratory (n = 268) and confirmatory (n = 164) factor analyses on the theoretically derived Bicultural Self-Efficacy Scale (BSES) items support a measurement model that taps into the 6 dimensions of bicultural competence proposed by T. LaFromboise, H. L. K. Coleman, and J. Gerton (1993). Furthermore, initial evidence for internal consistency (Studies 1, 2, and 3) and test-retest reliability (n = 51 Asian Americans) for each of the 6 subscales were found. Finally, perceived bicultural self-efficacy was found to be related to bicultural college students' psychological well-being and mental health. Research implications of the perceived bicultural self-efficacy construct and the potential utility of the BSES as a multidimensional measure of the construct are discussed.",
keywords = "acculturation, bicultural competence, ethnic minorities, mental health, self-efficacy",
author = "David, {E. J R} and Sumie Okazaki and Anne Saw",
year = "2009",
month = "4",
doi = "10.1037/a0015419",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "56",
pages = "211--226",
journal = "Journal of Counseling Psychology",
issn = "0022-0167",
publisher = "American Psychological Association Inc.",
number = "2",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Bicultural Self-Efficacy Among College Students

T2 - Initial Scale Development and Mental Health Correlates

AU - David, E. J R

AU - Okazaki, Sumie

AU - Saw, Anne

PY - 2009/4

Y1 - 2009/4

N2 - Theory and empirical research suggest that perceived self-efficacy, or one's perceived ability to perform personally significant tasks, is related to individuals' psychological well-being and mental health. Thus, the authors hypothesized that bicultural individuals' perceived ability to function competently in 2 cultures, or perceived bicultural self-efficacy, would be related positively to their psychological well-being and mental health. Three studies were conducted to develop and validate a measure of perceived bicultural self-efficacy and to explore its relationships with indices of psychological well-being and mental health. Exploratory (n = 268) and confirmatory (n = 164) factor analyses on the theoretically derived Bicultural Self-Efficacy Scale (BSES) items support a measurement model that taps into the 6 dimensions of bicultural competence proposed by T. LaFromboise, H. L. K. Coleman, and J. Gerton (1993). Furthermore, initial evidence for internal consistency (Studies 1, 2, and 3) and test-retest reliability (n = 51 Asian Americans) for each of the 6 subscales were found. Finally, perceived bicultural self-efficacy was found to be related to bicultural college students' psychological well-being and mental health. Research implications of the perceived bicultural self-efficacy construct and the potential utility of the BSES as a multidimensional measure of the construct are discussed.

AB - Theory and empirical research suggest that perceived self-efficacy, or one's perceived ability to perform personally significant tasks, is related to individuals' psychological well-being and mental health. Thus, the authors hypothesized that bicultural individuals' perceived ability to function competently in 2 cultures, or perceived bicultural self-efficacy, would be related positively to their psychological well-being and mental health. Three studies were conducted to develop and validate a measure of perceived bicultural self-efficacy and to explore its relationships with indices of psychological well-being and mental health. Exploratory (n = 268) and confirmatory (n = 164) factor analyses on the theoretically derived Bicultural Self-Efficacy Scale (BSES) items support a measurement model that taps into the 6 dimensions of bicultural competence proposed by T. LaFromboise, H. L. K. Coleman, and J. Gerton (1993). Furthermore, initial evidence for internal consistency (Studies 1, 2, and 3) and test-retest reliability (n = 51 Asian Americans) for each of the 6 subscales were found. Finally, perceived bicultural self-efficacy was found to be related to bicultural college students' psychological well-being and mental health. Research implications of the perceived bicultural self-efficacy construct and the potential utility of the BSES as a multidimensional measure of the construct are discussed.

KW - acculturation

KW - bicultural competence

KW - ethnic minorities

KW - mental health

KW - self-efficacy

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=65249170098&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=65249170098&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1037/a0015419

DO - 10.1037/a0015419

M3 - Article

AN - SCOPUS:65249170098

VL - 56

SP - 211

EP - 226

JO - Journal of Counseling Psychology

JF - Journal of Counseling Psychology

SN - 0022-0167

IS - 2

ER -