Beyond the rubric

Think-alouds as a diagnostic assessment tool for high school writing teachers

Sarah Beck, Lorena Llosa, Kristin Black, Alyssa Trzeszkowski-Giese

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

In order to teach writing effectively, teachers need assessment tools that work for diagnostic purposes - tools that can help them identify students' specific strengths and challenges with writing, as well as generate new ideas for instruction. This study explored what 5 high school teachers (3 ELA and 2 ESL) learned about their students' strengths and challenges as writers from the students' performance on a think-aloud-protocol (TAP) Assessment, how this information differed from what they knew about the students as writers based only on their previous writing in class, and what ideas this new TAP-generated information gave them for instruction. We found that the TAP Assessment was especially useful in generating new information related to audience awareness, interpretation of the task, and self-evaluation. Teachers also offered creative suggestions for adapting the TAP Assessment for further use in their classrooms. Free author podcast

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)670-681
Number of pages12
JournalJournal of Adolescent and Adult Literacy
Volume58
Issue number8
DOIs
StatePublished - May 1 2015

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diagnostic
teacher
school
student
writer
instruction
classroom
interpretation
evaluation
performance

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Education

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Beyond the rubric : Think-alouds as a diagnostic assessment tool for high school writing teachers. / Beck, Sarah; Llosa, Lorena; Black, Kristin; Trzeszkowski-Giese, Alyssa.

In: Journal of Adolescent and Adult Literacy, Vol. 58, No. 8, 01.05.2015, p. 670-681.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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