Behavioral flexibility in learning to sit

Jaya Rachwani, Kasey C. Soska, Karen Adolph

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

What do infants learn when they learn to sit upright? We tested behavioral flexibility in learning to sit-the ability to adapt posture to changes in the environment-in 6- to 9-month-old infants sitting on forward and backward slopes. Infants began with slant at 0° then slant increased in 2° increments until infants lost balance. Infants kept balance on impressively steep slopes, especially in the forward direction, despite the unexpected movements of the apparatus. Between slant adjustments while the slope was stationary, infants adapted posture to the direction and degree of slant by leaning backward on forward slopes and forward on backward slopes. Postural adaptations were nearly optimal for backward slopes. Sitting experience predicted greater postural adaptations and increased ability to keep balance on steeper changes of slant, but only for forward slopes. We suggest that behavioral flexibility is integral to learning to sit and increases with sitting experience.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalDevelopmental Psychobiology
DOIs
StateAccepted/In press - 2017

Fingerprint

Learning
Aptitude
Posture
Social Adjustment
Direction compound

Keywords

  • Flexibility
  • Infant
  • Postural control
  • Sitting
  • Sloping surface

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Developmental and Educational Psychology
  • Developmental Neuroscience
  • Developmental Biology
  • Behavioral Neuroscience

Cite this

Behavioral flexibility in learning to sit. / Rachwani, Jaya; Soska, Kasey C.; Adolph, Karen.

In: Developmental Psychobiology, 2017.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

@article{301d8a1db63a429bbfa65d4755b9522d,
title = "Behavioral flexibility in learning to sit",
abstract = "What do infants learn when they learn to sit upright? We tested behavioral flexibility in learning to sit-the ability to adapt posture to changes in the environment-in 6- to 9-month-old infants sitting on forward and backward slopes. Infants began with slant at 0° then slant increased in 2° increments until infants lost balance. Infants kept balance on impressively steep slopes, especially in the forward direction, despite the unexpected movements of the apparatus. Between slant adjustments while the slope was stationary, infants adapted posture to the direction and degree of slant by leaning backward on forward slopes and forward on backward slopes. Postural adaptations were nearly optimal for backward slopes. Sitting experience predicted greater postural adaptations and increased ability to keep balance on steeper changes of slant, but only for forward slopes. We suggest that behavioral flexibility is integral to learning to sit and increases with sitting experience.",
keywords = "Flexibility, Infant, Postural control, Sitting, Sloping surface",
author = "Jaya Rachwani and Soska, {Kasey C.} and Karen Adolph",
year = "2017",
doi = "10.1002/dev.21571",
language = "English (US)",
journal = "Developmental Psychobiology",
issn = "0012-1630",
publisher = "John Wiley and Sons Inc.",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Behavioral flexibility in learning to sit

AU - Rachwani, Jaya

AU - Soska, Kasey C.

AU - Adolph, Karen

PY - 2017

Y1 - 2017

N2 - What do infants learn when they learn to sit upright? We tested behavioral flexibility in learning to sit-the ability to adapt posture to changes in the environment-in 6- to 9-month-old infants sitting on forward and backward slopes. Infants began with slant at 0° then slant increased in 2° increments until infants lost balance. Infants kept balance on impressively steep slopes, especially in the forward direction, despite the unexpected movements of the apparatus. Between slant adjustments while the slope was stationary, infants adapted posture to the direction and degree of slant by leaning backward on forward slopes and forward on backward slopes. Postural adaptations were nearly optimal for backward slopes. Sitting experience predicted greater postural adaptations and increased ability to keep balance on steeper changes of slant, but only for forward slopes. We suggest that behavioral flexibility is integral to learning to sit and increases with sitting experience.

AB - What do infants learn when they learn to sit upright? We tested behavioral flexibility in learning to sit-the ability to adapt posture to changes in the environment-in 6- to 9-month-old infants sitting on forward and backward slopes. Infants began with slant at 0° then slant increased in 2° increments until infants lost balance. Infants kept balance on impressively steep slopes, especially in the forward direction, despite the unexpected movements of the apparatus. Between slant adjustments while the slope was stationary, infants adapted posture to the direction and degree of slant by leaning backward on forward slopes and forward on backward slopes. Postural adaptations were nearly optimal for backward slopes. Sitting experience predicted greater postural adaptations and increased ability to keep balance on steeper changes of slant, but only for forward slopes. We suggest that behavioral flexibility is integral to learning to sit and increases with sitting experience.

KW - Flexibility

KW - Infant

KW - Postural control

KW - Sitting

KW - Sloping surface

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=85032298320&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=85032298320&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1002/dev.21571

DO - 10.1002/dev.21571

M3 - Article

JO - Developmental Psychobiology

JF - Developmental Psychobiology

SN - 0012-1630

ER -