Behavioral-diagnostic analysis of compliance with universal precautions among nurses.

D. M. DeJoy, C. A. Searcy, L. R. Murphy, Robyn Gershon

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

This study used the PRECEDE model (L.W. Green, M.W. Kreuter, S.G. Deeds, & K.B. Partridge, 1980) to examine individual, job-task, and environmental-organizational factors related to compliance with universal precautions (UP) among nurses. Structural equation modeling showed that the hypothesized model did a better job predicting general compliance (R2 = .41) than compliance with personal protective equipment (PPE; R2 = .18). All 3 categories of diagnostic factors (predisposing, enabling, and reinforcing) influenced general compliance, but predisposing factors were relatively unimportant for compliance with PPE. With a set of nested models, the greatest improvement in model fit occurred when the indirect effects of reinforcing factors were added. A positive safety climate may increase the likelihood that the work environment will contain features that enable workers to comply with safe work practices.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)127-141
Number of pages15
JournalJournal of Occupational Health Psychology
Volume5
Issue number1
StatePublished - Jan 1 2000

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Universal Precautions
Causality
Nurses
Compliance
Climate
Safety

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Health Professions(all)
  • Psychology(all)

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Behavioral-diagnostic analysis of compliance with universal precautions among nurses. / DeJoy, D. M.; Searcy, C. A.; Murphy, L. R.; Gershon, Robyn.

In: Journal of Occupational Health Psychology, Vol. 5, No. 1, 01.01.2000, p. 127-141.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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