Behavior Identification as a Mediator of Dispositional Inference

Yaacov Trope, Ofra Cohen, Thomas Alfieri

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Abstract

According to Trope's (1986) 2-stage model, the use of situational information ("A was teased") to identify behavior ("A reacted aggressively") may result in subsequent dispositional inferences ("A is an aggressive person") that seem insensitive to situational information. Two determinants of the situational biasing effect on behavior identification were varied, namely, behavior ambiguity and order of situational and behavioral information. It was found that when behavior was ambiguous and preceded by situational information, the latter affected behavior identification but not dispositional inference; in contrast, when behavior was unambiguous or when it was followed by situational information, the latter affected dispositional inference but not behavior identification. Thus, the same conditions that allowed situational information to bias behavior identification also nullified the effect of situational information on dispositional inference.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)873-883
Number of pages11
JournalJournal of Personality and Social Psychology
Volume61
Issue number6
StatePublished - Dec 1991

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  • Social Psychology

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Behavior Identification as a Mediator of Dispositional Inference. / Trope, Yaacov; Cohen, Ofra; Alfieri, Thomas.

In: Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, Vol. 61, No. 6, 12.1991, p. 873-883.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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