Behavior and neural basis of near-optimal visual search

Wei Ji Ma, Vidhya Navalpakkam, Jeffrey M. Beck, Ronald Van Den Berg, Alexandre Pouget

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

The ability to search efficiently for a target in a cluttered environment is one of the most remarkable functions of the nervous system. This task is difficult under natural circumstances, as the reliability of sensory information can vary greatly across space and time and is typically a priori unknown to the observer. In contrast, visual-search experiments commonly use stimuli of equal and known reliability. In a target detection task, we randomly assigned high or low reliability to each item on a trial-by-trial basis. An optimal observer would weight the observations by their trial-to-trial reliability and combine them using a specific nonlinear integration rule. We found that humans were near-optimal, regardless of whether distractors were homogeneous or heterogeneous and whether reliability was manipulated through contrast or shape. We present a neural-network implementation of near-optimal visual search based on probabilistic population coding. The network matched human performance.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)783-790
Number of pages8
JournalNature Neuroscience
Volume14
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 2011

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Aptitude
Nervous System
Weights and Measures
Population

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Neuroscience(all)

Cite this

Ma, W. J., Navalpakkam, V., Beck, J. M., Berg, R. V. D., & Pouget, A. (2011). Behavior and neural basis of near-optimal visual search. Nature Neuroscience, 14(6), 783-790. https://doi.org/10.1038/nn.2814

Behavior and neural basis of near-optimal visual search. / Ma, Wei Ji; Navalpakkam, Vidhya; Beck, Jeffrey M.; Berg, Ronald Van Den; Pouget, Alexandre.

In: Nature Neuroscience, Vol. 14, No. 6, 06.2011, p. 783-790.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Ma, WJ, Navalpakkam, V, Beck, JM, Berg, RVD & Pouget, A 2011, 'Behavior and neural basis of near-optimal visual search', Nature Neuroscience, vol. 14, no. 6, pp. 783-790. https://doi.org/10.1038/nn.2814
Ma WJ, Navalpakkam V, Beck JM, Berg RVD, Pouget A. Behavior and neural basis of near-optimal visual search. Nature Neuroscience. 2011 Jun;14(6):783-790. https://doi.org/10.1038/nn.2814
Ma, Wei Ji ; Navalpakkam, Vidhya ; Beck, Jeffrey M. ; Berg, Ronald Van Den ; Pouget, Alexandre. / Behavior and neural basis of near-optimal visual search. In: Nature Neuroscience. 2011 ; Vol. 14, No. 6. pp. 783-790.
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