Barriers to Bicycle Helmet Use Among Children: Results of Focus Groups With Fourth, Fifth, and Sixth Graders

Jonathan Howland, James Sargent, Michael Weitzman, Thomas Mangione, Robert Ebert, Marianne Mauceri, Marie Bond

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

As a preliminary step in the development of a school-based educational intervention to promote bicycle helmet use among children, focus group encounters were conducted with fourth, fifth, and sixth graders at three elementary schools in the Boston, Mass, area. Analysis of transcripts of encounter tape recordings indicated that the prevalence of helmet ownership and use was low, children were concerned that helmet use would invite derision from their peers, and children tended to respect other children who wore helmets. We concluded that focus groups can be useful in conceptualizing health education interventions and suggest that school-based peer-led bicycle helmet programs may be effective in developing normative change toward helmet use among elementary schoolchildren.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)741-744
Number of pages4
JournalAmerican Journal of Diseases of Children
Volume143
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 1989

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Head Protective Devices
Focus Groups
Tape Recording
Ownership
Health Education

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health

Cite this

Barriers to Bicycle Helmet Use Among Children : Results of Focus Groups With Fourth, Fifth, and Sixth Graders. / Howland, Jonathan; Sargent, James; Weitzman, Michael; Mangione, Thomas; Ebert, Robert; Mauceri, Marianne; Bond, Marie.

In: American Journal of Diseases of Children, Vol. 143, No. 6, 01.01.1989, p. 741-744.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Howland, Jonathan ; Sargent, James ; Weitzman, Michael ; Mangione, Thomas ; Ebert, Robert ; Mauceri, Marianne ; Bond, Marie. / Barriers to Bicycle Helmet Use Among Children : Results of Focus Groups With Fourth, Fifth, and Sixth Graders. In: American Journal of Diseases of Children. 1989 ; Vol. 143, No. 6. pp. 741-744.
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