Barebacking identity among HIV-positive gay and bisexual men: Demographic, psychological, and behavioral correlates

Perry N. Halkitis, Leo Wilton, Richard J. Wolitski, Jeffrey T. Parsons, Colleen C. Hoff, David S. Bimbi

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Objectives: To determine the correlates associated with barebacking identity among HIV-positive gay and bisexual men. Design: An analysis of data from the baseline quantitative assessment of a randomized controlled intervention study of 1168 HIV-positive gay and bisexual men from New York City and San Francisco. Methods: Participants were actively and passively recruited from mainstream gay venues, AIDS service organizations, and public and commercial sex environments. Participants completed a computerized quantitative questionnaire assessing their identity as a barebacker, sexual behavior, demographic factors, psychosocial states, perceptions of health risks, and substance use. Results: Men of color were less likely to identify themselves as barebackers. Men who did identify themselves as barebackers were slightly younger. They were more likely to miss a dose of medication; report drug use (non-injection and injection); exhibit higher levels of sexual compulsivity and lower personal responsibility for safer sex; and report higher rates of unprotected insertive anal intercourse, unprotected receptive anal intercourse, and unprotected insertive oral intercourse with all partners, regardless of their HIV serostatus. Conclusion: Barebacking and its corresponding behaviors pose immediate public health risks for HIV-positive gay and bisexual men. Further work is needed to understand this phenomenon more fully in relation to the psychological, sociological, biomedical, and cultural realities.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalAIDS, Supplement
Volume19
Issue number1
StatePublished - Apr 2005

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Demography
HIV
Psychology
Safe Sex
San Francisco
Sexual Minorities
Sexual Behavior
Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome
Public Health
Color
Organizations
Injections
Health
Pharmaceutical Preparations

Keywords

  • Barebacking
  • Drug use
  • Gay and bisexual men
  • Health risk
  • HIV seropositivity
  • Sex behavior

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Immunology
  • Virology
  • Immunology and Allergy

Cite this

Halkitis, P. N., Wilton, L., Wolitski, R. J., Parsons, J. T., Hoff, C. C., & Bimbi, D. S. (2005). Barebacking identity among HIV-positive gay and bisexual men: Demographic, psychological, and behavioral correlates. AIDS, Supplement, 19(1).

Barebacking identity among HIV-positive gay and bisexual men : Demographic, psychological, and behavioral correlates. / Halkitis, Perry N.; Wilton, Leo; Wolitski, Richard J.; Parsons, Jeffrey T.; Hoff, Colleen C.; Bimbi, David S.

In: AIDS, Supplement, Vol. 19, No. 1, 04.2005.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Halkitis, PN, Wilton, L, Wolitski, RJ, Parsons, JT, Hoff, CC & Bimbi, DS 2005, 'Barebacking identity among HIV-positive gay and bisexual men: Demographic, psychological, and behavioral correlates', AIDS, Supplement, vol. 19, no. 1.
Halkitis, Perry N. ; Wilton, Leo ; Wolitski, Richard J. ; Parsons, Jeffrey T. ; Hoff, Colleen C. ; Bimbi, David S. / Barebacking identity among HIV-positive gay and bisexual men : Demographic, psychological, and behavioral correlates. In: AIDS, Supplement. 2005 ; Vol. 19, No. 1.
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