Awareness of the Tuskegee Syphilis Study and the US presidential apology and their influence on minority participation in biomedical research

Ralph Katz, S. Stephen Kegeles, Nancy R. Kressin, B. Lee Green, Sherman A. James, Qi Wang Min, Stefanie L. Russell, Cristina Claudio

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Objectives. We compared the influence of awareness of the Tuskegee Syphilis Study and the presidential apology for that study on the willingness of Blacks, non-Hispanic Whites, and Hispanics to participate in biomedical research. Methods. The Tuskegee Legacy Project Questionnaire was administered to 1133 adults in 4 US cities. This 60-item questionnaire addressed issues related to the recruitment of minorities into biomedical studies. Results. Adjusted multivariate analysis showed that, compared with Whites, Blacks were nearly 4 times as likely to have heard of the Tuskegee Syphilis Study, more than twice as likely to have correctly named Clinton as the president who made the apology, and 2 to 3 times more likely to have been willing to participate in biomedical studies despite having heard about the Tuskegee Syphilis Study (odds ratio [OR] = 2.9; 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.4, 6.2) or the presidential apology (OR = 2.3; 95% CI = 1.4, 3.9). Conclusions. These marked differences likely reflect the cultural reality in the Black community, which has been accustomed to increased risks in many activities. For Whites, this type of information may have been more shocking and at odds with their expectations and, thus, led to a stronger negative impact.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1137-1142
Number of pages6
JournalAmerican Journal of Public Health
Volume98
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 1 2008

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Syphilis
Biomedical Research
Odds Ratio
Confidence Intervals
Hispanic Americans
Multivariate Analysis
Surveys and Questionnaires

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

Cite this

Awareness of the Tuskegee Syphilis Study and the US presidential apology and their influence on minority participation in biomedical research. / Katz, Ralph; Kegeles, S. Stephen; Kressin, Nancy R.; Green, B. Lee; James, Sherman A.; Min, Qi Wang; Russell, Stefanie L.; Claudio, Cristina.

In: American Journal of Public Health, Vol. 98, No. 6, 01.06.2008, p. 1137-1142.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Katz, Ralph ; Kegeles, S. Stephen ; Kressin, Nancy R. ; Green, B. Lee ; James, Sherman A. ; Min, Qi Wang ; Russell, Stefanie L. ; Claudio, Cristina. / Awareness of the Tuskegee Syphilis Study and the US presidential apology and their influence on minority participation in biomedical research. In: American Journal of Public Health. 2008 ; Vol. 98, No. 6. pp. 1137-1142.
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