Awareness and knowledge of the U.S. Public Health Service syphilis study at Tuskegee

Implications for biomedical research

Jan M. McCallum, Dhananjaya M. Arekere, B. Lee Green, Ralph Katz, Brian M. Rivers

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

The purpose of this review was to collect and interpret the findings of all published qualitative or quantitative research that assessed African Americans' 1) general awareness and/or specific knowledge of the U.S. Public Health Service (USPHS) Syphilis Study at Tuskegee, and 2) attitudes towards and/or willingness to participate in biomedical research. An exhaustive review of the literature produced eight articles that fit the aforementioned selection criteria. All articles that assessed both awareness and knowledge found that familiarity with the USPHS Syphilis Study at Tuskegee did not necessarily ensure accurate knowledge of it. Four studies also found that awareness of the USPHS Syphilis Study at Tuskegee did not relate to willingness to participate in biomedical research. In addition to awareness and knowledge of the USPHS Syphilis Study at Tuskegee, published studies suggest that a broad array of structural and sociocultural factors influence minorities' willingness to participate in biomedical studies.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)716-733
Number of pages18
JournalJournal of Health Care for the Poor and Underserved
Volume17
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 2006

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public health services
United States Public Health Service
Syphilis
Biomedical Research
sociocultural factors
quantitative research
African Americans
Patient Selection
qualitative research
minority
Research

Keywords

  • Bioethics
  • Biomedical research
  • Minority groups
  • Research subjects
  • Tuskegee syphilis study

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health
  • Health Policy
  • Social Sciences (miscellaneous)

Cite this

Awareness and knowledge of the U.S. Public Health Service syphilis study at Tuskegee : Implications for biomedical research. / McCallum, Jan M.; Arekere, Dhananjaya M.; Green, B. Lee; Katz, Ralph; Rivers, Brian M.

In: Journal of Health Care for the Poor and Underserved, Vol. 17, No. 4, 11.2006, p. 716-733.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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