Attendance and outcome in a work site weight control program

Processes and stages of change as process and predictor variables

James O. Prochaska, John C. Norcross, Joanne L. Fowler, Michael J. Follick, David Abrams

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

This naturalistic study assessed client changes during treatment and identified salient predictors of therapy attendance and outcome. Subjects were assessed on processes and stages of change, self-efficacy, social support, weight history (including expectations, goals, and reasons for losing weight), and demographics at the beginning, middle, and end of a 10-week, behaviorally oriented work site program for weight control. Significant shifts from contemplation to action occured for clients remaining in treatment. There were also significant modifications in the use of change processes as a result of treatment: counterconditioning, contingency management, stimulus control, interpersonal control, and social liberation increased while medication use, wishful thinking, and minimizing threats decreased. Change processes employed during the early portion of the group treatment were the best predictors of treatment attendance and outcome, superior to self-efficacy, social support, weight history, and demographic variables. The results supported a transtheoretical model that emphasizes dynamic processes and stages as core dimensions for understanding how people change.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)35-45
Number of pages11
JournalAddictive Behaviors
Volume17
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - 1992

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Weight control
Workplace
Weights and Measures
Self Efficacy
Social Support
History
Demography

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Psychiatry and Mental health
  • Clinical Psychology

Cite this

Attendance and outcome in a work site weight control program : Processes and stages of change as process and predictor variables. / Prochaska, James O.; Norcross, John C.; Fowler, Joanne L.; Follick, Michael J.; Abrams, David.

In: Addictive Behaviors, Vol. 17, No. 1, 1992, p. 35-45.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Prochaska, James O. ; Norcross, John C. ; Fowler, Joanne L. ; Follick, Michael J. ; Abrams, David. / Attendance and outcome in a work site weight control program : Processes and stages of change as process and predictor variables. In: Addictive Behaviors. 1992 ; Vol. 17, No. 1. pp. 35-45.
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