Associations between white matter microstructure and infants' working memory

Sarah J. Short, Jed T. Elison, Barbara Davis Goldman, Martin Styner, Hongbin Gu, Mark Connelly, Eric Maltbie, Sandra Woolson, Weili Lin, Guido Gerig, J. Steven Reznick, John H. Gilmore

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    Abstract

    Working memory emerges in infancy and plays a privileged role in subsequent adaptive cognitive development. The neural networks important for the development of working memory during infancy remain unknown. We used diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) and deterministic fiber tracking to characterize the microstructure of white matter fiber bundles hypothesized to support working memory in 12-month-old infants (n= 73). Here we show robust associations between infants' visuospatial working memory performance and microstructural characteristics of widespread white matter. Significant associations were found for white matter tracts that connect brain regions known to support working memory in older children and adults (genu, anterior and superior thalamic radiations, anterior cingulum, arcuate fasciculus, and the temporal-parietal segment). Better working memory scores were associated with higher FA and lower RD values in these selected white matter tracts. These tract-specific brain-behavior relationships accounted for a significant amount of individual variation above and beyond infants' gestational age and developmental level, as measured with the Mullen Scales of Early Learning. Working memory was not associated with global measures of brain volume, as expected, and few associations were found between working memory and control white matter tracts. To our knowledge, this study is among the first demonstrations of brain-behavior associations in infants using quantitative tractography. The ability to characterize subtle individual differences in infant brain development associated with complex cognitive functions holds promise for improving our understanding of normative development, biomarkers of risk, experience-dependent learning and neuro-cognitive periods of developmental plasticity.

    Original languageEnglish (US)
    Pages (from-to)156-166
    Number of pages11
    JournalNeuroImage
    Volume64
    Issue number1
    DOIs
    StatePublished - Jan 1 2013

    Fingerprint

    Short-Term Memory
    Brain
    Learning
    Diffusion Tensor Imaging
    Aptitude
    White Matter
    Child Development
    Individuality
    Cognition
    Gestational Age
    Biomarkers
    Radiation

    Keywords

    • Brain development
    • Diffusion tensor imaging
    • Infant
    • White matter
    • Working memory

    ASJC Scopus subject areas

    • Cognitive Neuroscience
    • Neurology

    Cite this

    Short, S. J., Elison, J. T., Goldman, B. D., Styner, M., Gu, H., Connelly, M., ... Gilmore, J. H. (2013). Associations between white matter microstructure and infants' working memory. NeuroImage, 64(1), 156-166. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.neuroimage.2012.09.021

    Associations between white matter microstructure and infants' working memory. / Short, Sarah J.; Elison, Jed T.; Goldman, Barbara Davis; Styner, Martin; Gu, Hongbin; Connelly, Mark; Maltbie, Eric; Woolson, Sandra; Lin, Weili; Gerig, Guido; Reznick, J. Steven; Gilmore, John H.

    In: NeuroImage, Vol. 64, No. 1, 01.01.2013, p. 156-166.

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    Short, SJ, Elison, JT, Goldman, BD, Styner, M, Gu, H, Connelly, M, Maltbie, E, Woolson, S, Lin, W, Gerig, G, Reznick, JS & Gilmore, JH 2013, 'Associations between white matter microstructure and infants' working memory', NeuroImage, vol. 64, no. 1, pp. 156-166. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.neuroimage.2012.09.021
    Short SJ, Elison JT, Goldman BD, Styner M, Gu H, Connelly M et al. Associations between white matter microstructure and infants' working memory. NeuroImage. 2013 Jan 1;64(1):156-166. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.neuroimage.2012.09.021
    Short, Sarah J. ; Elison, Jed T. ; Goldman, Barbara Davis ; Styner, Martin ; Gu, Hongbin ; Connelly, Mark ; Maltbie, Eric ; Woolson, Sandra ; Lin, Weili ; Gerig, Guido ; Reznick, J. Steven ; Gilmore, John H. / Associations between white matter microstructure and infants' working memory. In: NeuroImage. 2013 ; Vol. 64, No. 1. pp. 156-166.
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